Course Offerings

Below is a sample of courses offered to all students at Oglethorpe.
Courses are subject to availability and may change.

Accounting
ACC 200 Independent Study in Accounting (1-4 hours)
Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair and the provost or associate provost no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see the Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

ACC 230 Financial Accounting (4 hours)
This course is a study of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and other accounting concepts with emphasis on their application in the financial statements of business enterprises. The measurement and reporting of assets, liabilities and owners’ equity is stressed, along with the related measurement and reporting of revenue, expense and cash flow. Prerequisite: Second semester freshman standing or above or approval of the instructor.

ACC 231 Managerial Accounting (4 hours)
This course is a study of the use of accounting information by managers and decision makers within an economic enterprise. Cost analysis for purposes of planning and control is emphasized. Prerequisite: ACC 230.

ACC 240 Business Law I (4 hours)
This course provides an overview of the legal and ethical environment of business with special emphasis on the law of contracts, negotiable instruments, agency, sales and warranties, credit and secured transactions, intellectual property, business organizations, and on-line commerce. Cross-listed as BUS 240.

ACC 241 Business Law II (4 hours)
This course is a more in-depth study of current issues in the legal and ethical environment of business, including topics such as employment law, antitrust issues, and the social responsibility of business. Prerequisite: BUS 240 or ACC 240. Cross-listed as BUS 241.

ACC 290 Special Topics in Accounting (1-4 hours)
An intense study of diverse accounting topics under the direct supervision of an accounting faculty member. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

ACC 332 Intermediate Accounting I (4 hours)
This course covers financial accounting topics at an intermediate level. The topics covered are similar to Financial Accounting but in greater depth. The standards promulgated by the Financial Accounting Standards Board are considered and evaluated. The preparation and the theoretical foundations of the financial statements are emphasized. Prerequisite: ACC 231.

ACC 333 Intermediate Accounting II (4 hours)
This course is a continuation of Intermediate Accounting I with emphasis on advanced topics such as dilutive securities, investments, capitalized leases, pension costs, inter-period income tax allocation and accounting changes and errors, and the statement of cash flows. Prerequisite: ACC 332.

ACC 334 Cost and Managerial Accounting (4 hours)
This course is a more advanced study of the accounting information required for the managerial activities covered in ACC 231. The course includes the study of the analytical techniques and methodologies used to generate accounting information and the managerial use of accounting information. The topics covered include profitability analysis, cost allocation, inventory management, budgeting, relevant cost analysis, performance evaluation and pricing decisions. Prerequisite: ACC 231.

ACC 335 Income Tax Accounting: Individuals (4 hours)
This course provides an overview of the federal income tax system primarily as it relates to individuals. The study of the federal tax law provides the necessary tax background for a variety of accounting, financial and managerial careers. Prerequisite: ACC 231.

ACC 336 Income Tax Accounting: Corporations, Partnerships, Estates and Trusts (4 hours)
This course is a study of the federal income tax laws and related accounting problems of corporations and partnerships, with some consideration of estates and trusts. Consideration will be given to the role of taxation in business planning and decision making and the interrelationships and differences between financial accounting and tax accounting. Prerequisite: ACC 335.

ACC 400 Advanced Independent Study in Accounting (1-4 hours)
This course will be conducted as supervised advanced research on a selected topic. Prerequisites: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see the Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

ACC 434 Internship in Accounting (1- 12 hours)
An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to interview and secure an internship opportunity with an accounting firm, obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement and have the learning agreement accepted by the experiential education committee. Graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and be qualified for the internship program.

ACC 435 Advanced Accounting (4 hours)
This course is a study of advanced accounting concepts. Topics covered include the methods of accounting for business combinations including the equity method and consolidated financial statements, as well as issues that arise regarding outside ownership and intercompany transactions. Other topics covered include foreign currency transactions, partnership formation, operation, and termination, and a brief introduction to accounting for state and local governments. Prerequisite: ACC 332.

ACC 436 Accounting Control Systems (4 hours)
This course is an in-depth study of the application of information systems concepts to the accounting environment. Emphasis is on the processing of data in a computerized environment as well as the controls that are necessary to assure accuracy and reliability of the data processed by an accounting system. Practical implications of accounting information system design and implementation will be investigated through the use of cases and projects. Prerequisites: ACC 231 and CSC 101.

ACC 437 Auditing (4 hours)
This course is a study of auditing standards and procedures, including the use of statistical and other quantitative techniques and preparation of audit working papers, reports and financial statements. Emphasis is placed upon the auditing programs and substantive testing. Prerequisite: ACC 332.

ACC 438 Accounting Theory (4 hours)
This course covers the principles and concepts of accounting at an advanced theoretical level. The emphasis is on critical analysis of the ideas on which accounting practice is based along with an appreciation for the intellectual foundations for those ideas. Prerequisite: ACC 333.

ACC 490 Advanced Special Topics in Accounting (1-4 hours)
Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered generally for juniors or seniors as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

Art
ART 101 Introduction to Drawing (4 hours)
This course is an introductory level studio course which will focus on mastering the fundamentals of drawing. Working from observation in line and value, students will develop an understanding of form and shape; volume and flatness; spatial relationships; the basics of perspective and composition; the materials and techniques of drawing. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 102 Introduction to Painting (4 hours)
This course is an introductory level studio course which will focus on understanding and mastering the fundamentals of painting. Working from observation, this includes developing an understanding of color and color relationship; form and shape; volume and flatness; the basics of composition; the materials and techniques of oil painting. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 103 Introduction to Figure Sculpture (4 hours)
Working from the life model, students will convey their understanding of the human form in clay. Planar structure, volume, proportion and major anatomical landmarks will be covered. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 104 Introduction to Printmaking (4 hours)
Introduction to Printmaking is an introductory level studio course that will use the medium of printmaking as a vehicle for exploring visual language. Students will undertake formal and thematic design problems via the mediums of relief, dry point and lithographic printmaking approaches. Offered every spring. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 105 Video Production (4 hours)
This course will introduce students to the techniques and tools of basic video production. Students will learn to think visually and consider lighting, color, composition and movement as they relate to production. The importance of sound and how the audible and the visual components support and complement each other will be considered. Students will have the opportunity to work with video editing software. This course is also cross listed as CRS 115. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 106 Introduction to Figure Drawing (4 hours)
Working from the life model, students will learn to draw the human form in a variety of approaches and mediums, including contour and diagrammatic line, value and gesture. Proportion, planar structure, and major anatomical landmarks will be covered. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 109 Introduction to Photography (4 hours)
Laboratory exercises, in-class lectures, critiques and assignments are designed to develop an understanding of all aspects of traditional black and white photography, including composition and self-expression. Emphasis will be on development of technical skills and aesthetic direction in photography.
Prerequisite: A fully manual camera, to be brought to the first class meeting. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 110 Ways of Seeing (4 hours)
This course systematically breaks down the vocabularies of art to their component elements, studying how these elements work together to form visual language. Problems in color and composition will be undertaken in a variety of media, including ink, acrylic and photography. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 111 Anatomy for the Artist and Figure Drawing (4 hours)
This course focuses on both the scientific and the aesthetic exploration of the human body. Drawing from the life model, students will study form and function of the skeletal and muscular systems, along with proportion and surface landmarks. A variety of approaches to drawing and drawing materials will be covered. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 115 Introduction to Digital Photography (4 hours)
This course is an introductory level studio course which will approach digital photography as a fine art medium. The course will teach technical proficiency with digital cameras and Adobe Photoshop; expose students to traditional and digital photography via lectures, gallery/museum trips and research; and explore visual expression of ideas through the use of the photographic digital medium with a conceptual emphasis. No prior experience with photography, Adobe Photoshop or with digital cameras is required. Students may use either a digital or regular 35mm camera. Offered every spring. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 117 Introduction to Archaeology (4 hours)
This course examines scientific dating methods, archaeological discoveries, and the rise of modern archaeology. Taught in an interdisciplinary and discussion-based format, this course, in addition, is both a science and a humanities course, exploring the varieties of evidence, surveying and excavation techniques, dating methods, tools and technology, and theoretical explanations of material culture. Furthermore, students will explore case studies in archaeology, and heritage management.

ART 119 Symbology: World Symbols and Cultures (4 hours)
Symbology is the critical and aesthetic study of traditional and esoteric world symbols, signs, codes, and representative sacred images in world cultures. This course will explore the cosmological, religious, social, and political symbols of cultures, moving through Paleolithic beginnings up to and including contemporary attempts to create symbols for the 21st century. Students will also examine both ancient and modern use of exoteric and esoteric symbologies hidden and referenced in pre-scientific occult knowledge, such as alchemy and the Cabala, and assess their continuous use in Western art and architecture. Furthermore, this course analyzes both sacred and secular icons and structures through the lens of sacred geometry, mythological beliefs, the language of symbols, and the apparent archetypal patterns found in visual cultures. In an interdisciplinary format, this course will explore the recent discoveries in cosmology, physics, art, and consciousness as background for understanding why and how we create and re-work symbols, and how those symbols shape aesthetic and spiritual insights

ART 200 Independent Study in Art History (1-4 hours)
This course will be conducted as supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisites: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

ART 201 Intermediate Drawing (4 hours)
This course explores drawing as a tool for perception and a means of self-expression. Students will undertake advanced problems in drawing which build upon concepts and techniques covered in Introduction to Drawing. These include problems involving the surface of the picture plane and the ground plane, arrangements of elements in static and dynamic compositions and value pattern.
Prerequisite: ART 101 or ART 111. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 202 Intermediate Painting (4 hours)
Students will build upon experiences in Introduction to Painting and undertake more complex formal and personal issues in their work. They will be expected to master a wide range of visual vocabularies and approach painting from a variety of aesthetic points of view. Imagery, realism, abstraction, expressionism and narration will be explored as students begin to develop individual direction in their own work.
Prerequisite: ART 102. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 203 Intermediate Figure Sculpture (4 hours)
Working from the life model, this level of sculpture builds upon conceptual and perceptual skills honed in Introduction to Figure Sculpture. Students are expected to approach sculpting the human form from a variety of aesthetic points of view, including realism, abstraction and expressionism.
Prerequisite: ART 103. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 204 Intermediate Printmaking (4 hours)
Intermediate Printmaking is an intermediate level studio course which will build upon printmaking approaches studied in Introduction to Printmaking. It will explore new vocabularies, including monotype, reverse relief, chin collé, photocopy lithography and calligraphy. Students will work in series format exploring advanced themes and design problems. Offered every spring. Prerequisite: ART 104. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 205 Documentary Filmmaking (4 hours)
This course covers the theory and practice of planning and executing public affairs, informational and cultural documentary programs. Students will be introduced to short-form and long-form documentaries, emphasizing the technical and aesthetic aspects of documentary filmmaking using video production techniques. Production projects will be geared toward the development of proficiency in documentary planning, writing, production and post-production. Students will produce short documentaries using a combination of personal cameras and broadcast quality cameras and digital editing equipment. Prerequisite: CRS 115 or ART 105, or permission of the instructor. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 206 Concepts in Photography (4 hours)
This studio course focuses on photography as a fine art medium. It assumes a proficiency in technical 35mm film photography and darkroom skills and experience with developing and visually expressing ideas through the medium. Experimentation with advanced techniques such as lighting and timed exposures, as well as with other formats, including digital, will be introduced in order to encourage pushing image making to the next level. We will also employ alternative presentation methods. The emphasis will move beyond the technical toward concept (idea)-based goals.
Prerequisite: ART 109 or ART 115. A non-refundable fee will be billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 208 Independent Study in Studio Art (1-4 hours)
This course will be conducted as supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisites: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.). A non-refundable fee will be billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 214 Alternative Methods in Darkroom and Digital Photography (4 hours)
This course will take students back to the early days of photography, starting with the origins of pinholes and pinhole camera construction. This will shed light on the mysteries of how exactly images are created from light. We will move forward chronologically to examine contemporary practices in photography. We will explore different types of printing & various materials as well as post printing image manipulations such as toning, transfers and mixing media. As mainstream photography becomes more digitally based this class will offer an alternative by returning to the roots of photography and hands-on imagery with the added twist of attempting some of these same techniques using digital cameras, merging past with present. Prerequisite: ART 109 or ART 115. A non-refundable fee will be billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 215 Intermediate Digital Photography (4 hours)
This intermediate course requires that students have taken ART 115 Introduction to Digital Photography first (or have equivalent experience). A student’s understanding of their digital camera and basic Photoshop skills are necessary. The course will build upon what was learned in ART 115 and push photographic image creation to the next level. Visual and conceptual excellence will be emphasized. Study of color, landscape and phenomenology will be incorporated and everyone will make and self-publish their own fine art photography book. The class will continue to study contemporary photographers by visiting exhibitions at Atlanta galleries and museums. Prerequisite: ART 115. A non-refundable fee will be billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 220 Compositions in Photography (4 hours)
This hybrid intermediate photography course will challenge students to apply the ideas and techniques learned from prior courses in order elevate their art. Students will work in film and/or digital, thereby illustrating that either medium may serve to accomplish artistic and conceptual goals. The conversation will include the chosen medium for each project. Discussion and critiques are also elevated to the next level and fluidity with expressing your process is expected, both in writing and verbally in class. Projects will include a semester long photographic nature document and journal that will be due at final critique and three traditional conceptual assignments. Students will also be asked to engage with ideas from contemporary and historical sources and to create their own personal and sophisticated visual responses.
Prerequisite: ART 109 or ART 115. A non-refundable fee will be billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 260 Ancient Art History (4 hours)
This course will cover the art and archaeology of the ancient and classical world from 3000 BCE to the rise of Christianity in Europe. The course will focus on the architecture, sculpture, and recent archaeological finds, as well as the mythology and religion of each culture, using primary sources such as artifacts, literature, and monuments. Cultures covered will include Mesopotamia, Egypt, Bronze Age Crete, Greece and Rome. It is recommended that students take COR 104 before taking this course.

ART 290 Special Topics in Studio Art (1-4 hours)
Studio exercises, in-studio lectures, outside assignments and critiques are designed to develop a basic understanding of various media, including printmaking and various specialties of artists-in-residence.
Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 291 Special Topics in Art History (1-4 hours)
An in-depth analysis of specific historical art periods will stress how major artists and trends were influenced by their times. Discussion of important events and ideas of significant individuals of the period will serve to provide the necessary background for a thorough comprehension of social and intellectual sources of art. It is recommended that students take COR 104 before taking this course. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

ART 300 Italian Renaissance Art History (4 hours)
This course explores the paintings, sculpture and architecture of Italy from 1300 to 1650. Chronological in format, this course enables students to analyze and understand the principle styles, methods and contexts of Italian art and its intrinsic value in the study of European art. It is recommended that students take COR 104 before taking this course.

ART 302 Advanced Painting (4 hours)
Students will build upon prior experiences in Intermediate Painting and be guided to set parameters for individual inquiry in their work. Emphasis will be on personal imagery and control of formal issues to express the students’ ideas. Each student will be expected to develop ideas and themes in a cohesive body of work.
Prerequisite: ART 202. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 310 Northern Renaissance and Baroque Art History (4 hours)
This course will cover the art of Northern Europe from the late Gothic through the Baroque period (the late 14th to the end of the 17th century). A range of media and styles will be explored such as illuminated manuscripts, architecture, printmaking and painting, including the work of Durer, Rembrandt and Vermeer. It is recommended that students take COR 104 before taking this course.

ART 320 18th and 19th Century European Art History (4 hours)
This course focuses on the major artists and movements of the 18th and 19th centuries in Europe, beginning with the late Baroque and progressing through the Rococo, the Neoclassical, Romantic, Realist, Impressionist and the Pre-Raphaelite, as well as Expressionism and Art Nouveau Movements. Students will analyze the major paintings, architecture and sculpture of each period as reflections of the political, social and religious realities of the time. It is recommended that students take COR 104 before taking this course.

ART 330 Far Eastern Art History – India, China, Tibet and Japan (4 hours)
This course will explore the paintings, sculpture and architecture of India, China, Tibet, Japan and other Eastern cultures. Chronological in format, this course will enable students to analyze and understand principle styles, methods and cultural contexts of Eastern art. This course will compare and contrast Eastern and Western approaches and attitudes toward art. It is recommended that students take COR 104 before taking this course.

ART 340 The Art of the Americas, Africa, Oceania and Others (4 hours)
This course will look at how non-Western and often pre-technological people around the world created their visual arts. The course will cover African, Oceanic, and the ancient Americas, providing and in-depth analysis of artifacts, symbols, and mythical constructs which underscore the idea of “the primitive”, or first, cultures. Both living and extinct cultures will be studied. It is recommended that students take COR 104 before taking this course.

ART 350 Modern Art History (4 hours)
This course will examine major movements in the visual arts from the end of the 19th century to the present, focusing primarily on Europe and America. The student will be expected to explore connections between visual culture and broader historical trends and be able to recognize, understand and discuss the important works of art of the 20th century. It is recommended that students take COR 104 before taking this course.

ART 360 Modern and Contemporary Architecture (4 hours)
This course examines the contextual role of architecture from 1900 through the beginning of the 21st century. Taught in an interdisciplinary format, the course will explore the social, political, economic, and symbolic meanings of built environments, and the concepts, theories, and visions of architects from the early modernists up to and including the most recent global architectural movements, including sustainable, solar, and green architecture. Prerequisite: Any Art History course or permission of the instructor.

ART 400 Advanced Independent Study in Art History (1-4 hours)
Supervised research on a selected topic in art history. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair and the provost or associate provost no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

ART 405 Senior Exhibition (1 hour)
This course will function as an advanced level studio experience in which students prepare for, and participate in, the Senior Exhibition during spring semester of their graduating year. The course will guide students on how to write an artist’s statement, self-edit and present their own work, plan the Senior Exhibition, share the responsibilities for the reception, and hang and strike the show. Students will meet periodically throughout the semester in preparation for hanging the show prior to Commencement. Students will also learn how to document their work and will turn in a CD, DVD, flash drive, or other device for digital storage that represents a portfolio of their best work from their Oglethorpe Studio Art education. Prerequisite: Graduating Senior Studio Art Majors and Studio Art Minors only, by invitation of the instructor.

ART 408 Advanced Independent Study in Studio Art (1-4 hours)
Supervised studio art on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair and the provost or associate provost no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.). A non-refundable fee will be billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 410 Internship in Art (1-4 hours)
An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services. Graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor, qualification for the internship program, permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement proposal by experiential education committee.

ART 490 Advanced Special Topics in Studio (1-4 hours)
This is an advanced level of Special Topics in Studio Art such as sculpture, photography, drawing, printmaking, etc. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

ART 491 Advanced Special Topics in Art History (1-4 hours)
Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered generally for juniors or seniors as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

Business Administration

BUS 200 Independent Study in Business Administration (1-4 hours)
This course will be conducted as supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisites: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

BUS 240 Business Law I (4 hours)
This course provides an overview of the legal and ethical environment of business with special emphasis on the law of contracts, negotiable instruments, agency, sales and warranties, credit and secured transactions, intellectual property, business organizations, and on-line commerce. Cross-listed as ACC 240.

BUS 241 Business Law II (4 hours)
This course is a more in-depth study of current issues in the legal and ethical environment of business, including topics such as employment law, antitrust issues, and the social responsibility of business. Prerequisite: BUS 240 or ACC 240. Cross-listed as ACC 241.

BUS 260 Principles of Management (4 hours)
This course is an introduction to the principles of management and administration. It includes the study of leadership, conflict resolution, decision making and the general functions of management in large and small organizations. Students will use computers extensively to do active research and will learn spreadsheet and graphical tools to aid in the development of their decision-making skills.

BUS 275 Business Analytics (4 hours)
With the rapid growth of data acquisition along with the technological advances in computing capabilities, large amounts of data are now being generated. This course develops fundamental knowledge and skills in the use of statistics to gain insights and assist in managerial decision making that enhances competitive advantage in the dynamic marketplace.

BUS 290 Special Topics in Business Administration (1-4 hours)
An intense study of diverse business topics under the direct supervision of a business administration faculty member. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

BUS 310 Corporate Finance (4 hours)
This course is a study of the basic principles of organizational finance and its relation to other aspects of business management and to the economic environment within which the firm operates. Attention is given to basic financial concepts, techniques of financial analysis, sources of funding, asset management, capital budgeting, capital structure, cost of capital, time value of money and financial decision making under conditions of uncertainty. Prerequisites: ACC 231, MAT 111, and math requirement for Business majors.

BUS 350 Marketing (4 hours)
This course is concerned with the policies and problems involved in the operation of market institutions. It will examine broad principles and concepts involved in the operation of market planning, market segmentation, consumer behavior, product management and pricing, distribution and promotion of goods and services. Aspects of global marketing, current marketing topics and ethical and social responsibility issues in marketing are addressed. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

BUS 351 Retailing (4 hours)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with one aspect of the marketing activity of distribution known as retailing. The course will involve looking at all the activities necessary to sell goods and services to the final consumer. This will include an examination of such retail topics as consumer markets and behavior, retail site location, retail store operations and management, pricing and communication decisions, merchandising, decision analysis and evaluation and the regulatory, technological and ethical environments in which retailing operates. Prerequisite: BUS 350.

BUS 352 Marketing Communications (4 hours)
Principles, concepts and practices relating to the various kinds of communications employed to disseminate information about products and services to potential buyers are topics in this course. Communication methods to be studied include advertising, personal selling, sales promotion and public relations. The behavioral aspects of both messages and media will be explored. Prerequisite: BUS 350.

BUS 360 Leadership and Power in Business (4 hours)
One of the most popular subjects in the field of management is leadership and for good reason. At the macro level, leadership plays a critical role in the success of the organization. At the micro level, the debate continues as to whether leaders are born or made. This course will examine both the macro and micro issues of leadership through the review of leadership research as well as the study of business leaders.

BUS 362 Human Resources Management (4 hours)
In this course students will explore the perspectives and challenges of Human Resources Management (HRM) within the context of the emerging global economy. The class will look at traditional HRM topics such as selection and compensation and also at how students can manage their own human resource potential. Prerequisite: BUS 260.

BUS 370 International Business (4 hours)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the problems encountered in conducting business outside one’s own country and to provide a basis for evaluating the impact on business activities of changing economic, political and cultural factors. Cases will be used throughout the course to give the student experience with the problems and advantages of doing business across national frontiers. A cultural diversity simulation game also will be used. Prerequisite: BUS 260.

BUS 382 Management-Labor Relations (4 hours)
This course will explore the dynamic relationship between management and organized labor. The major topics to be covered include the history of the American labor movement, labor legislation, collective bargaining, grievance procedures, arbitration and unionization in the public sector. Prerequisite: BUS 260.

BUS 400 Advanced Independent Study in Business Administration (1-4 hours)
Supervised research on a selected topic in business administration. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair and the provost or associate provost no later than final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

BUS 410 Advanced Corporate Finance (4 hours)
As a continuation of Corporate Finance, topics in this course will include capital budgeting, intermediate and long-term funding, current asset management, working capital management and dividend policy. Case studies will be used to emphasize actual business situations and to focus on the comprehensive financial management of the firm. Prerequisite: BUS 310.

BUS 411 Investments (4 hours)
This course is an introduction to the environment in which investment decisions are made. Topics explored will include efficient markets, the capital asset pricing model, term structure of interest rates, risk versus return and performance measures. Although the emphasis will be on stocks and bonds, other investments will be discussed. Prerequisite: BUS 310.

BUS 419 Management Science (4 hours)
This course is an introduction to operations research, model building, optimization, linear programming, inventory models and simulation. Major techniques and models of quantitative analysis as applied to business are studied. Prerequisites: CSC 101, MAT 111 and math requirement for Business majors.

BUS 450 Consumer Behavior (4 hours)
This course is designed to develop and enhance an understanding of how and why individuals, groups and organizations select, secure, use and dispose of products and the impact this has on consumers and society. The course is interdisciplinary, drawing upon the fields of economics, marketing, psychology and sociology. Ethical, legal and international aspects of consumer behavior are explored in the course. Prerequisite: BUS 350.

BUS 451 Direct and Interactive Marketing (4 hours)
This course is designed to introduce the student to the specialized field of interactive marketing which uses all media to affect a measurable consumer response. Topics to be explored include direct marketing planning, mailing lists and databases, media selection, techniques for creating and producing direct response campaigns, internet marketing and managing the interactive marketing operation. Prerequisite: BUS 350.

BUS 456 Marketing Research (4 hours)
This course is designed to explore topics such as the types of research, the research process, research design, sampling procedures, data collection methods, data analysis and preparation and presentation of research findings. A research project and presentation of findings is usually required in the course. Prerequisites: BUS 350, CSC 101, and MAT 111.

BUS 462 Recruitment and Selection (4 hours)
This course will present the information needed to develop and implement an effective employee selection program. Topics include selection measures such as predictors (background information, interviews and tests), criteria (work sample data, personnel data, etc.), validity and reliability of measures, job analysis techniques and selection instruments including weighted application blanks, interviews, ability tests, personality assessment and the performance tests. Legal and ethical issues are discussed throughout. Prerequisite: BUS 362.

BUS 469 Strategic Management (4 hours)
This course is the capstone integration course for the business program. Students learn integrative thinking skills and strategic management tools through both the reading of conceptual work and the extensive use of the case studies. This course must be taken in residence in order to fulfill the requirements for a degree in this major. Prerequisites: BUS 240, BUS 260, BUS 310, BUS 350, ACC 230, ACC 231.

BUS 490 Advanced Special Topics in Business Administration (1-4 hours)
Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered generally for juniors or seniors as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

BUS 495 Internship in Business Administration (4 hours)
An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services. Graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor, qualification for the internship program, permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the experiential education committee.

Communication and Rhetoric Studies
CRS 101 Theories of Communication and Rhetoric (4 hours)
This gateway course to the major is designed to establish a broad understanding of various theories used in communication and rhetoric studies. Students will learn theories about messages themselves as well as the various contexts in which they occur, including interpersonal communication, public communication, mass communication, intercultural and gendered communication. The ethical implications of these theories will also be considered.

CRS 110 Public Speaking I (4 hours)
This course is designed to develop and enhance students’ ability to communicate effectively to any audience. Students will deliver both prepared and impromptu speeches. They will give humorous and inspirational speeches as well as informational speeches focusing on organization and the use of visual aids. Students develop all the tools necessary to effectively communicate – their voice, their gestures, their body language and their eye contact. They will receive timely written and oral feedback from the instructor. Speeches will be videotaped and critiqued. The goal is to become a more polished and confident speaker. Prerequisite: Students who speak English as a second language must have permission of the instructor.

CRS 120 Introduction to Media Studies (4 hours)
In this course students will study the historical development of the media and interrelationships between them in order to understand the impact of these cultural industries on our lives and our culture. Through their examination of the products and processes of the media, students will learn will develop critical media literacy. Offered every semester.

CRS 200 Independent Study in Communication and Rhetoric Studies (1-4 hours)
This course will be conducted as supervised research on a selected topic. It is open to students pursuing a major in Communication and Rhetoric Studies. Prerequisites: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.). Depending on the topic of the course, a non-refundable fee may be billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

CRS 240 Journalism (4 hours)
This course teaches the fundamentals of journalistic news writing and reporting. Using a range of techniques from interviews to internet research, students will learn how to gather information from a variety of sources and write stories using different types of leads, endings and structures. They will also engage in a critique of today’s journalistic practices. Offered Fall semesters.

CRS 260 Writing for Business and the Professions (4 hours)
This course is for students who have mastered the basic skills and insights of writing and who wish to improve their ability to write clear, concise, persuasive prose designed for audiences in business and the professions. Students are required to write a variety of texts, such as letters, proposals, progress reports and recommendation reports. Other elements of the course may include oral presentations. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102. Offered alternate spring semesters.

CRS 280 Gender, Culture, and Communication (4 hours)
This course investigates the relationships among gender, culture, and communication. Students will explore theoretical approaches to gender; the cultural histories of women’s, men’s and transgender movements; cultural views of gendered interaction, including discourse and relational styles as well as other performances; and the practices of gendered communication and identity in a variety of cultural and institutional contexts. Offered every Fall. Cross-listed as WGS 280.

CRS 290 Special Topics in Communication and Rhetoric Studies (4 hours)
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule. Depending on the topic of the course, a non-refundable fee may be billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

CRS 310 Public Relations Writing (4 hours)
Public Relations Writing is designed to teach students the fundamentals of public relations writing and media techniques. The course will provide students with opportunities to develop effective writing skills for the public relations profession with an emphasis on different approaches required to communicate with audiences and media. Students will focus on the practical application of tools and techniques used by public relations practitioners, while gaining an understanding of how specific public relations tactics fit into the broader context of a public relations communications program. Prerequisites: CRS 101 and CRS 240, or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate spring semesters.

CRS 320 Persuasive Writing (4 hours)
This course is designed to develop sophisticated strategies of persuasion for analyzing and generating arguments responsive to targeted audiences in a variety of contexts, including civic, professional and academic. Students will learn both classical and contemporary strategies of persuasion. Emphasis will be on presenting clear, coherent and logical arguments. Students will be asked to define their own projects within assigned contexts. Students will evaluate their own and others’ writing to enable the revision process. This course is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors only. Offered Spring semester. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102.

CRS 340 Mass Media Effects (4 hours)
This course examines how various media influence individuals and society. The focus will be on the influence of news, entertainment programming, advertising and public communication campaigns. Students will become more aware of media influence and develop an understanding of the role of media effects research in public policy. Prerequisites: COR 102, CRS 101 and CRS 120.

CRS 400 Advanced Independent Study in Communication and Rhetoric Studies (1-4 hours)
Supervised advanced research on a selected topic. Open to students pursuing a major in communication and rhetoric studies. Prerequisite: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.). Depending on the topic of the course, a non-refundable fee may be billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

CRS 401 Internship in Communication and Rhetoric Studies (1-6 hours)
An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to qualified students. An internship for the writing minor must be writing intensive. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including opportunities at CNN, Fox 5, WSB-TV, Q100, The Home Depot and Creative Loafing. Students are strongly encouraged to do multiple internships, but only 6 semester hours can be applied as elective credits to the major. Graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor, qualification for the internship program permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the experiential education committee.

CRS 415 Survey of Research Methods (4 hours)
This course introduces students to qualitative and quantitative methods such as surveys, experiments, archival research, case studies and causal analysis. The class will examine these research methods from several different angles including research techniques specific to each method, skills to critically evaluate such research and the epistemological considerations and practical consequences of undertaking such research. Students considering graduate school or careers that require them to use and assess research may find this course particularly valuable. Cross-listed as POL 371 and SOC 310. Offered spring semester in alternate years. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

CRS 420 Media, Culture and Society (4 hours)
Using various approaches from cultural studies to political economy, students examine how meaning is created by the media. This course focuses on media texts, media institutions and media audiences and the way they intersect to shape culture. Topics covered include media representations of gender, race and class. Offered alternate fall semesters. Prerequisites: CRS 101, CRS 120, and junior standing (or permission of the instructor).

CRS 430 Race and Representation in the Media (4 hours)
In this course students will examine the portrayal of race in the media, focusing specifically on radio, television, and film. At the end of the semester, students will be able to: identify and critically examine the use and functions of racial images in the media; understand and analyze the uniqueness of each medium and the advantages and/or challenges that it poses to the representation of race; and recognize and explore the larger cultural and societal implications of these mediated representations. Prerequisites: CRS 101, CRS 120 and sophomore standing (or permission of the instructor).

CRS 470 Globalization and the Media (4 hours)
The rapid evolution of communication technologies has increased the ability of global media corporations to reach audiences around the world. This course examines the political, economic and cultural dimensions of media globalization. Topics covered include cultural imperialism, global news, international trade organizations and regulatory bodies, global advertising and cultural protectionism. Offered alternate fall semesters. Prerequisites: CRS 101, CRS 120, and junior standing (or permission of the instructor).

CRS 480 Rhetoric of Human Rights (4 hours)
This course investigates the theories and rhetorical strategies used to practice human rights as “universal” and the critical challenges of this universality. The rhetoric of universal human rights as it is actually used in texts by competing interests in an increasingly globalized and culturally diverse world communally will be evaluated. Prerequisites: CRS 101 and junior standing, or permission of the instructor.

CRS 490 Advanced Special Topics in Communication and Rhetoric Studies (4 hours)
This advanced course will examine selected topics in rhetoric, communications or media studies, such as Civic Literacy; Global Culture and Rhetoric; Political Rhetoric. This course may be taken more than once. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule. Depending on the topic of the course, a non-refundable fee may be billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

English and Comparative Literature

ENG 101 Ancient Literature (4 hours)
This course will examine the literature of the ancient world. The primary focus will be on Greek and Roman literature. Works and authors might include: Homer, Aristophanes, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Plautus, Terence, Seneca, Petronius, Ovid, and Virgil. Offered every fall.

ENG 102 Medieval and Renaissance Literature (4 hours)
This course will examine the transition of the cultural world of Dante to that of Shakespeare and Milton. Although the primary focus will be Western, non-Western works may also be studied. Texts and authors might include: Beowulf, Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Rabelais, Chaucer, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton. Offered every spring.

ENG 103 18th and 19th Century Literature (4 hours)
Authors in this course might include: Defoe, Pope, Austen, Wordsworth, Brontë, Hardy and George Eliot. Offered every fall.

ENG 104 Modern and Contemporary Literature (4 hours)
This course will investigate the literature of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Authors might include: T.S. Eliot, Woolf, Lawrence, Forster, Joyce, Beckett and Pynchon. Offered every spring.

ENG 105 World Literature: Ancient to Modern (4 hours)
This course will survey significant texts from around the world ranging from ancient Egyptian poetry to essays by Montaigne through ancient and medieval epics like The Ramayana and Sundiata and fictional narratives like The Tale of Genji, before moving to early-to-mid twentieth-century authors like Rabindranath Tagore, Chinua Achebe, Nawal el Sadaawi, and Gabriel García Márquez. Either ENG 105 or ENG 106 (or both) will be offered once per academic year.

ENG 106 World Literature: Modern Global Perspectives (4 hours)
This course will survey contemporary works of twentieth- and twenty-first-century literature in translation around the world. Authors include Gustave Flaubert, Franz Kafka, Higuchi Ichiyo, Jorge Luis Borges, Colm Tóibín, Margaret Atwood, and Chimamanda Adichie. Either ENG 105 or ENG 106 (or both) will be offered once per academic year.

ENG 200 Independent Study in Literature and Composition (1-4 hours)
This course will be conducted as supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisites: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

ENG 201 Chaucer (4 hours)
Students will learn to read and appreciate the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, the first great English poet, in his original language; to enjoy the rich and varied nature of his works—to appreciate why he is called “the Father of English.” Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher). Offered every other year.

ENG 204 Shakespeare: Early Plays to 1603 (4 hours)
This course will examine the genres and plays that define Shakespeare’s career up until 1603, the year marking the end of Elizabeth I’s reign and the start of James I’s. This chronology will allow a focus on the genre Shakespeare defined known as the “History Play,” comedies through Twelfth Night, “problem comedies” such as All’s Well That Ends Well, and tragedies up through Hamlet. Offered in alternate years. Fulfills English Department requirement for Shakespeare or Chaucer. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher). Students who have taken ENG 206 may take ENG 204 for 300-level elective credit.

ENG 206 Shakespeare: Late Plays, 1603-1613 (4 hours)
This course will examine the genres and plays that define Shakespeare’s career after 1603, the year marking the end of Elizabeth I’s reign and the start of James I’s, up until the playwright’s presumed retirement. This chronology will allow a focus on most of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies and his best “Romances.” Offered in alternate years. Fulfills English Department requirement for Shakespeare or Chaucer. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher). Students who have taken ENG 204 may take ENG 206 for 300-level elective credit.

ENG 210 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies (4 hours)
This course is designed as an introduction to the methods and tools of research in the study of literature, including textual, critical, social, historical, and cultural approaches. Readings, exercises, assignments, and discussions are designed to help students develop transferable research and writing skills, applicable to both academic and non-academic settings. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102 (concurrent enrollment acceptable).

ENG 230 Creative Writing (4 hours)
This course is an introduction to writing poetry and prose fiction. The student will be asked to submit substantial written work each week, keep a journal and read published writers. Much class time will be spent discussing student and published work. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 231 Biography and Autobiography (4 hours)
This course is an introduction to biographical and autobiographical writing with practice in the personal narrative and personal essay as well as other forms such as the profile and the interview. Students will submit substantial written work each week and keep a journal. The class will follow a workshop format, discussing the students’ and published work. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 240 Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies (4 hours)
This course aims to provide a foundation in intermediate literary and cultural studies skills via a topics approach that allows for greater breadth of coverage across multiple time periods and different genres within British, American, and global literature. Possible topics include “Postcolonialism,” “Modernity,” “Nation and Community,” or “Women’s Writing.” Topics vary by semester. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 241 Topics in Genre Studies (4 hours)
This course examines a selected literary genre (including fiction, poetry, drama and non-fiction) within and across a range of historical periods and cultural and national contexts. In addition to learning about genres, students will develop skills of close reading, textual support, inter-textual analysis and critical thinking. Topics vary by semester. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 330 Writing Poetry (4 hours)
In weekly assignments students will try free verse and various forms in the effort to discover and to embody more and more truly what they have to say. Much time will be spent reading published poets, responding to student work in class and trying to generate language that reveals rather than explains intangible “meanings.” Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 331 Writing Prose, Fiction and Nonfiction (4 hours)
Students will get instruction and substantial practice in writing fictional and nonfictional prose which aims at getting what Henry James called “a sense of felt life” onto the page. The class will follow a workshop format with weekly assignments, journal writing, extensive discussion of student work and reading of published examples. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 340 Advanced Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies (4 hours)
This advanced level course will explore a particular topic in a Literary and Cultural Studies sub-area, including both specific British, American, and global authors, and specific eras of English and global literature from the Medieval Period through the present. Students will read and write critically about literary texts (written and visual), cultural theory, and avenues of inquiry that theoretical approaches open. Students will also learn how to locate and evaluate the resources that literary and cultural studies depend on, and how to use disciplinary-specific methods of presenting and documenting work. Topics vary by semester. Prerequisite: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 341 Advanced Topics in Genre Studies (4 hours)
This advanced level course will facilitate the intensive study of the historical development of a selected genre (poetry, drama, fiction, literary non-fiction); major critical theories and approaches, current as well as foundational; and the historical, cultural, and ideological conditions under which specific genres have been produced and received. Students will also learn how to locate and evaluate the resources that genre studies depend on, and how to use disciplinary-specific methods of presenting and documenting work. Topics vary by semester. Prerequisite: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 393 Special Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies (4 hours)
Courses relating literature with aspects of social and intellectual history or a particular issue or theme. Possible offerings may include women in literature, American civilization, African-American (or other ethnic) literature, popular culture, the literature of a single decade, children’s literature and myth and folklore in literature. Usually offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 394 Special Topics in Major Authors (4 hours)
An intensive study of between one and three major authors or texts. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 400 Advanced Independent Study in Literature and Composition (1-4 hours)
Supervised study in specified genres or periods. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course; submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair and the provost or associate provost no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

ENG 401 Internship in English (1-4 hours)
An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including opportunities at Atlanta Magazine, The Knight Agency and Peachtree Publishers. Graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor, qualification for the internship program, permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement proposal by experiential education committee.

History

HIS 101 Foundations of the West (4 hours)
This course explores the foundations and development of Western civilizations from late antiquity to the end of the seventeenth century. The focus of the course will be on the methods and sources used by historians to uncover the history of this period, with special emphasis on such issues as the development of language, culture, political institutions, and social structures. Offered every fall. HIS 101 cannot be counted towards either the geographic or the period distribution requirement.

HIS 102 Europe and the World, 1715 to the Present (4 hours)
This course introduces students to the modern history of Europe and its interactions with the world. Major developments in society, economy, technology, politics, war, and diplomacy will be analyzed. A central theme will be the relationship of state and society. Students are introduced to history as a subject of study. Offered every spring. HIS 102 cannot be counted towards either the geographic or the period distribution requirement.

HIS 130 United States History to 1865 (4 hours)
A survey from Colonial times to 1865, concerned mainly with the major domestic developments of a growing nation. Offered alternate years. [A,3]

HIS 131 United States History Since 1865 (4 hours)
A survey from 1865 to the present, concerned with the chief events which explain the growth of the United States to a position of world power. Offered alternate years. [A,3]

HIS 200 Independent Study in History (1-4 hours)
This course will be conducted as supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisites: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

HIS 201 Ancient Greece (4 hours)
This course will examine the Greeks from their Minoan and Mycenaean antecedents through the rise of Macedonia in the mid-fourth century B.C.E. Students will investigate the political, social, economic and cultural aspects of Greek civilization as well as an appreciation of the Hellenic world’s legacy. Specific topics include: the collapse of Mycenaean civilization and the problem of a “Dark Age;” the rise, development and failure of the polis system; Greek contact with eastern cultures; the political significance of hoplite warfare; the roles of women in various Greek poleis; competing models of Greek political organization. Offered spring semester in alternate years. [E,1]

HIS 202 Roman History (4 hours)
This course will trace the history of Rome from its Italian precursors through the ascension of Constantine. Topics will include political, religious, social, cultural and economic aspects of Rome’s development, focusing on the origins, maturation, decline and transformation of its civilization. Offered spring semester in alternate years. [E,1]

HIS 211 The Renaissance and Reformation (4 hours)
Students will study the significant changes in European art, thought and institutions during the period from 1300 to 1550. The course will focus on critical readings of primary sources from this era. Offered fall semester in alternate years. [E,2]

HIS 212 Early Modern Europe (4 hours)
This course will examine the development of European society and politics from the end of the Reformation to the eve of the French Revolution. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of the modern state, the contest between absolutism and constitutionalism and the Enlightenment. Offered spring semester in alternate years. [E,2]

HIS 213 The Age of Revolution—Europe and the Atlantic World 1776-1849 (4 hours)
The “old regime” (serfdom, rule by monarchs and nobles and a politically powerful church) and an agrarian way of life had prevailed in much of Europe and the New World since the Middle Ages. From 1776 on, however, a series of upheavals, such as the American and French revolutions, the Napoleonic Wars, the Latin American Wars of Independence and the European revolutions of 1820-21, 1830-31 and 1848-49 had challenged the old order. This course studies the events of this dramatic period, including the Industrial Revolution and the rise of romanticism, socialism, nationalism and liberalism. [E,3]

HIS 214 The Age of Empire and Nationalism—Europe 1848-1914 (4 hours)
The six decades following the revolutions of 1848 were a period of remarkable power, prosperity and creativity in Europe. New nation-states (Germany and Italy) were formed; old multiethnic empires (Russia and Austria-Hungary) seemed rejuvenated; and Europeans acquired immense colonial empires. Meanwhile, industrialization and modern science and art revolutionized European life and thought. However, this fusion of cultural and economic modernity with social and political conservatism concealed grave weaknesses that would lead, beginning in 1914, to the upheavals of world war, communism and fascism. Offered every three years. [E,3]

HIS 215 Europe: From World Wars to Cold War (4 hours)
This course examines the disasters that befell Europe in the three decades after 1914: World War I; the Russian Revolution; the ill-fated Treaty of Versailles; the rise of Mussolini; the Great Depression; the dictatorships of Hitler and Stalin; the spread of fascism in the 1930s; World War II. The course discusses the reasons for the failure of the international order to prevent two horrific military conflicts and for the failure of moderate forces in many European countries – including Russia, Germany, Italy and Spain – to block the rise to power of violent and millenarian political forces. Offered every three years. [E,3]

HIS 219 German History Since 1800 (4 hours)
This course is a survey of German history in the 19th and 20th centuries, focusing on the unification of Germany in the 19th century, the Bismarckian state, the two world wars, the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich and the division and subsequent reunification of Germany after World War II. Offered every three years. [E,3]

HIS 220 Russia under the Tsars (4 hours)
This course studies the thousand years from the formation of the Kievan state until the abolition of serfdom. It covers the Mongol invasion, the rise of Muscovy, the reign of Ivan the Terrible and the Time of Troubles, Imperial Russia’s Westernization under Peter the Great and its apogee under Catherine the Great and her grandsons. Offered fall semester every three years. [E,2,3]

HIS 221 Russian History Since 1861 (4 hours)
This course studies Russian history from the abolition of serfdom, which began Imperial Russia’s last attempt to reform itself and stave off revolution, until the present. It also covers the 1905 and 1917 revolutions, the rise of communism, the era of Lenin and Stalin and the fall of the communist system. Offered fall semester every three years. [E,3]

HIS 222 History of the Holocaust (4 hours)
This class focuses on understanding how and why the Holocaust happened. The course covers the perspectives of perpetrators, victims, and bystanders. We will analyze the motives and actions of each group seeking to find answers to very difficult questions. [E,3]

HIS 234 To Tell a Free Story: African American History to 1900 (4 hours)
This course introduces students to African American History from the arrival of African people in the Americas, and the establishment of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, to the abolition of slavery in the United States, and the reconstruction of black life after the American Civil War. [A,3]

HIS 240 Latin America to Independence (4 hours)
Latin American history from the origins of pre-Columbian civilizations to independence will be examined by exploring the origins and development of indigenous societies in Mesoamerica and the Andes; the conquest and colonization of (what became) Spanish and Portuguese America; the nature of colonial control; the response of indigenous populations to colonial society, administration and religion; the developing tensions between Spaniards and Creole elites. The movement for independence, which arose from a variety of issues, created by contrasting views and concerns of distant European authority and local cultural identity, will be studied. Finally, the major challenges that faced the newly emergent Latin American nations will be considered. Offered in alternate years. [L,2]

HIS 255 The Land of Milk and Honey: The History of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict (4 hours)
This course examines the relationship between Israelis and Palestinians. We explore how Israel became a state and how Palestinians came together without a state. We will look at this history from a variety of sources and seek to understand the various and complicated motives between each side and within both groups. [E,3]

HIS 290 Special Topics in History (4 hours)
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

HIS 301 History of Christianity (4 hours)
This course will examine the origins and development of Christianity through the modern era. Special areas of interest include the structure and organization of the church, the development of liturgy and doctrine and the counterpoint between orthodoxy and heresy. A central question will be the relationship between the “three pillars” of doctrine—revelation, reason and tradition—and social pressures in the history of the church and doctrine. Offered spring semester in alternate years. [E,1,2]

HIS 306 The Rise of the Roman Empire 270-130 B.C. (4 hours)
Polybius once remarked that the most remarkable events in history were that in only 53 years the Roman Republic obtained undisputed mastery over the Mediterranean world. This course will examine the rise of the Roman Empire during the late third and second centuries B.C., focusing on patterns of diplomacy, in particular Rome’s dealings with the states of Greece, Egypt and the Near East. Offered every three years. [E,1]

HIS 307 The End of the Roman Republic 130 B.C.-14 A.D. (4 hours)
One of the more important historical questions has been the one that asks “How did the Roman republic become the Roman Empire?” This course will examine that problem with respect to the end of the Republic as a historiographical issue and a source problem. A central component of the course will be the close examination of two important works on the subject, Eric Gruen’s Last Generation of the Roman Republic and Ronald Syme’s seminal Roman Revolution, arguably one of the most influential and controversial books on Roman history. Offered every three years. [E,1]

HIS 309 The Fall of Rome and the Dark Ages (4 hours)
This course will examine the “fall” of the Roman Empire in late antiquity and the subsequent rise of barbarian kingdoms in Europe. The primary issue will be to determine whether the Roman Empire did in fact “fall” during this time or whether the period actually marks a transition, the birth of Europe. The role of Christianity in the transformation of Europe will be a major focus of discussion, as well as other social, political and economic issues. Offered every three years. [E,1]

HIS 310 The Age of Chivalry, 800-1450 (4 hours)
This course will cover the High and Later Middle Ages, from the later Carolingian period through the War of the Roses. The main focus will be on the evolution of state and society in northern and Western Europe during these periods. Special attention will be given to such events as the rise of feudal monarchies, the Investiture Contest, the Norman Conquests, and the Hundred Years’ War. Offered spring semester in alternate years. [E,1]

HIS 311 The Crusades (4 hours)
During the late 11th, 12th and 13th centuries Western Europe, which had long been the prey of foreign invaders, became the feared hunter in the eastern Byzantine and Muslim worlds. The Crusades represented a tremendous clash between civilizations, with both destructive and beneficial consequences whose effects lasted for centuries. Students will study the Crusades from both the European and Arab viewpoints. [E,1]

HIS 313 The Origins of European Imperialism, 950-1750 (4 hours)
From the tenth century onwards one can see a progressive expansion of Western Europe, first to the fringes of the European continent, and then to Africa, Asia, and the Americas. This course charts the course of early European expansion, examining the causes of the European diaspora, the nature of colonial societies and the interactions between Europe and the wider world during the first Global age. [E,1,2]

HIS 314 Modern European Imperialism (4 hours)
European imperial states reached the peak of their power in the nineteenth century. These little states crowded onto a peninsula jutting off the west side of Asia somehow came to control up to three-quarters of the rest of the world. How they did so, why they did so, what the colonized thought of these interlopers, how the colonized and the colonizers affected each other, how the local populations of the colonies threw off their imperial yokes, and what were the long-range consequences for both sides will be topics of our study during this semester. [E, 2]

HIS 315 History of Atlanta (4 hours)
The object of this course is to use Atlanta as a laboratory to study change in the metro area through time. The course will delineate the forces that have shaped our city and our suburbs helped create today’s metropolitan configuration, the behavior of people who live in the city and suburbs, the changing roles of downtown, the growth of neighborhoods, the shifting alliances of political power, the evolution of race relations, transportation, the outward sprawl of suburban communities, and the prospects for the future development of Atlanta. The course surveys how social, political, economic, historical and geographic forces transformed a little railroad gulch in the 1840s to the new international city of today. [A,3]

HIS 319 Rise and Fall of the Third Reich (4 hours)
The course examines the roots of National Socialism in Germany before World War I; the reasons for the failure of the Weimar Republic in the 1920s, which ended in Hitler’s coming to power; and the nature of Hitler’s dictatorship, with its policies of totalitarian rule, world war and genocide. Offered every three years. [E,3]

HIS 330 Between World Wars: The United States, 1920-1945 (4 hours)
During this period of war, prosperity and depression, the United States underwent dramatic economic, political, social and cultural changes. The interwar years witnessed the emergence of the United States as a world power, an increasingly sophisticated women’s movement, the rise of mass production and mass consumption and a variety of new challenges to social and economic policies. The Great Depression and the New Deal brought further challenges to traditional liberal political and economic assumptions as the federal government intervened in nearly every aspect of American life. World War II again transformed the nation as it ushered in the “age of affluence” and cold wars in the international and domestic realms. Offered alternate years. [A,3]

HIS 331 The Age of Affluence: The United States Since 1945 (4 hours)
An interdisciplinary study of American life since World War II, this course will emphasize political, economic and social developments. Foreign policy is considered principally with respect to its impact on domestic affairs. Offered alternate years. [A,3]

HIS 340 Dictatorship and Democracy in Latin America (4 hours)
This course will examine the roots, character and impact of authoritarian rule – and resulting resistance movements – in Latin America. Included will be a look at the caudillos that competed for power after independence, the Liberal dictatorships of the late 19th century, the Depression Dictators of the 1930s, Populist dictators of the 1940s and 1950s and the rise of military-bureaucratic dictatorships in the 1960s and 1970s. An understanding will be sought for why almost all political orientations (Republicanism, Liberalism, nationalism, Populism and Communism) offered up a dictator as their champion at some point in Latin American history and how Latin American nations have been able to make a transition to democracy. Finally, consideration will be given to how dictatorships affect the everyday lives and perceptions of the people living under them and in their aftermath. Offered alternate years. [L,3]

HIS 400 Advanced Independent Study in History (1-4 hours)
Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair and the provost or associate provost no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

HIS 410 The Vikings and the Anglo-Saxons (4 hours)
This course examines the meteoric rise of the Scandinavians from obscurity to become the terror of Europe in the eighth through the 11th centuries. For purposes of comparison, a look also will be taken at the Vikings’ more “civilized” cousins, the Anglo-Saxons. While both medieval and modern historians have tended to draw a thick line between these two cultures, this course will suggest that both represent aspects of a general political, economic and cultural zone in the Northern Seas. Offered every three years in the spring. [E,1] Prerequisite: Either junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor.

HIS 412 Radical Religion and Revolution (4 hours)
This course will examine the role of radical theologies in shaping a series of rebellions and revolutions in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern era. Some of the conflicts studied will include the Hussite Revolution, the German Reformation and the English Civil War. In addition, some modern examples illustrating the connections between religion and revolutionary thought, in particular, liberation theology in Latin America and the current crisis in the Middle East will be considered. Offered every three years in the spring. [E,2] Prerequisite: Either junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor.

HIS 413 The Witch Craze (4 hours)
The era of the Renaissance, the supposed “rebirth” of classical civilization, also witnessed one of the more horrific episodes of modern times: the witch-craze of the 16th and 17th centuries. Large-scale persecution of witches peaked in the years between 1590 and 1630. Although there has been a good deal of scholarly work done on the problem, much of it has been marred by misconceptions and methodological errors. Our task in this course will be to attempt to come to a more sophisticated understanding of the persecution of witches, its causes, and the relationship of the “witch-craze” to the development of modern consciousness. Offered every three years in the spring. [E,2] Prerequisite: Either junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor.

HIS 430 American Civil War and Reconstruction (4 hours)
A course emphasizing the causes of conflict, the wartime period and major changes that occurred. Offered irregularly. [A,3]

HIS 431 History of United States Foreign Relations (4 hours)
This course is a study of major developments in American diplomacy from the end of the Revolution until 1945. Offered alternate years. [A,3]

HIS 450 Senior Seminar in Historiography (2 hours)
This course constitutes the capstone for the history major. The seminar will give students the opportunity to reflect on their previous course work and develop their skills through careful reexamination of major texts and the revision of a major paper. The course will involve regular presentations and discussion. Prerequisite: Enrollment limited to declared senior History majors and senior students with IPMs demonstrating a concentration in History.

HIS 451 Internship in History (1-4 hours)
An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including opportunities at the Atlanta History Center, the Atlanta Preservation Center, the Holocaust Center and the Coosawattee Foundation archeological dig. Graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program, permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the experiential education committee.

HIS 490 Advanced Special Topics in History (4 hours)
Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered generally for juniors or seniors as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

Non-Profit Management

NPM 220 The Nonprofit Sector (4 hours)
Through both readings and field experience in nonprofits students will explore the nonprofit sector beginning with the mission of nonprofits. The traditional functions of any business will be explored along with the functions specific to nonprofits such as fund development and the management of volunteers. Current topics in nonprofits including connected capitalism will be included. Professional development of students is emphasized.

NPM 265 Nonprofit Communications (4 hours)
This course will focus on strategic communication for nonprofits and help students develop the skills necessary to frame messages for different situations and audiences. Students will learn to produce documents such as solicitation letters, proposals and newsletter articles that reflect an understanding of both the organization’s and the audience’s needs. In addition they will learn the basics of making effective oral presentations and persuasive speeches. Offered in spring semester of alternate years.

NPM 290 Special Topics in Nonprofit Management (1-4 hours)
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

NPM 469 Seminar in Nonprofit Management (4 hours)
Through the use of case studies, students will apply their nonprofit knowledge in addition to learning about the successes and challenges facing nonprofits. Topics to be covered include nonprofit marketing, HRM, grant writing, accounting, and strategic planning. Students will also manage the student-created nonprofit, LAB Bridge. This is the senior capstone course for the Nonprofit minor. Prerequisites: NPM 220, NPM 265, and BUS 290 Special Topics in Business Administration: Introduction to Nonprofit Accounting.

NPM 490 Advanced Special Topics in Nonprofit Management (1-4 hours)
Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered generally for juniors or seniors as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

Politics

 POL 101 Introduction to American Politics (4 hours)
This course is an introduction to the fundamental questions of politics through an examination of the American founding and political institutions. Offered every year.

POL 111 International Relations (4 hours)
This course is an introduction to the conduct of politics in a condition of anarchy. The central issues will be how and whether independent states can establish and preserve international order and cooperate for the achievement of their common interests in an anarchic environment. These questions will be explored through a reading of relevant history and theoretical writings and an examination of present and future trends influencing world politics. Offered fall semester.

POL 121 Introduction to Comparative Politics (4 hours)
This course traces the evolution of major theories and methodologies of comparative politics from the 1960s to present, analyzing both their distinguishing characteristics and how these theories respond to the prominent political issues and intellectual debates of their times. Topics to be covered include: political behavior, political culture, revolutions, modernization, political economy, rational choice, institutions and the state with democratization serving as an overarching theme. Offered spring semester.

POL 200 Independent Study in Politics (1-4 hours)
This course will be conducted as supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisites: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

POL 201 Constitutional Law (4 hours)
In this course, we will examine the Constitution and the efforts of the United States Supreme Court to expound and interpret it. In addition to reading and briefing many Supreme Court decisions, students will examine some leading contemporary works in constitutional and legal theory. Offered spring semester in alternate years. Prerequisite: POL 101.

POL 211 War (4 hours)
What is war? How and to what extent has it changed through the ages? Why are wars won or lost? When is war just? How will war be fought in the future, with what results? Offered alternate years.

POL 231 Asian Politics (4 hours)
This course is a general introduction to the variety of political systems in Asia, concentrating particularly on the nations of East Asia. It will emphasize the methods of comparative political study and will focus on understanding the factors that determine different political outcomes in nations that share a geographical region and many similar cultural and historical influences.

POL 290 Special Topics in Politics (4 hours)
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

POL 302 American Political Parties (4 hours)
An in-depth study of the development of party organizations in the United States and an analysis of their bases of power. Offered fall semester of alternate years. Prerequisite: POL 101.

POL 303 Congress and the Presidency (4 hours)
An examination of the original arguments for the current American governmental structure and the problems now faced by these institutions. Offered spring semester of alternate years. Prerequisite: POL 101.

POL 304 African-American Politics (4 hours)
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the various strategies and tactics used by African-Americans to advance their economic, social and political agendas. As such, the course will provide a detailed examination of the successes and failures of the interaction between the United States political system and African-Americans from both an historic and present-day perspective. Offered every year. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

POL 311 United States Foreign Policy (4 hours)
A history of American foreign policy since 1945, emphasis in this course will be on the description, explanation and evaluation of events and policies, not the study of policy-making as such. It is strongly recommended that students successfully complete POL 111 International Relations before enrolling in POL 311.

POL 321 Political Development (4 hours)
This course surveys substantive themes and theoretical debates in the study of political development including: what is meant by ‘political development,’ cultural versus structural explanations for change, whether development is driven by domestic or international influences, political transitions and the relative significance of particular groups or institutions. Readings build from theoretical touchstones from Human Nature and the Social Order II (Smith, Marx, Weber) to address contemporary cases in developing and developed countries. Prerequisite: POL 121 and COR 202, or permission of the instructor.

POL 331 Comparative Politics of China and Japan (4 hours)
While Japan and China have both become prominent nation-states with increasing international influence, each country has achieved this feat through very different means. This course seeks to ascertain the sources and strength of their respective development paths as well as the prognosis for their political and economic futures. Topics to be covered include: state formation, ideology and political order, political and economic institutions, economic development strategies, ‘Asian values,’ state-society relations, regional and international relations. Prerequisite: POL 121 and POL 231, or permission of the instructor.

POL 341 Political Philosophy I: Ancient and Medieval (4 hours)
This is an examination of the origins of philosophical reflection on the fundamental issues of politics, which is designed to lead to the critical consideration of the political views of our time. Among the topics discussed are the relationship between knowledge and political power and the character of political justice. Portions of the works of Aristophanes, Plato, Cicero and Alfarabi are examined. Offered fall semester in alternate years. Prerequisite: COR 201 or permission of the instructor.

POL 342 Political Philosophy II: Modern (4 hours)
This is a critical examination of the peculiarly modern political and philosophical stance beginning where Political Philosophy I concludes. Among the authors discussed are Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant and Kojeve. Offered spring semester in alternate years. Prerequisite: POL 341, or permission of the instructor.

POL 361 European Politics (4 hours)
This course is a factual, conceptual and historical introduction to politics on the European continent, including (but not necessarily limited to) Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Russia and the European Union. These regimes will be studied through a comparison of their social structures, party systems, institutions and constitutions, political cultures and (if possible) their domestic policies. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POL 101.

POL 371 Survey of Research Methods (4 hours)
This course introduces students to qualitative and quantitative methods such as surveys, experiments, archival research, hermeneutical research, case studies and causal analysis. The class will examine these research methods from several different angles including research techniques specific to each method, skills to critically evaluate such research, the epistemological considerations and practical consequences of undertaking such research. Students considering graduate school or careers that require them to sue and assess research may find this course particularly valuable. Cross-listed as CRS 415 and SOC 310. Offered spring semester in alternate years. Prerequisite: Students with junior standing or permission of the instructor.

POL 400 Advanced Independent Study in Politics (1-4 hours)
Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

POL 411 War, Peace and Security (4 hours)
An in-depth treatment of one or more of the issues introduced in International Relations. The course will be conducted as a seminar, with the emphasis on reading, discussion and research. It will address the following questions: When and why do statesmen resort to force to resolve international conflicts? When does the threat of force succeed or fail and when and how ought one to employ it? When and why do states make peace? What are the causes of conflict in the present and future? What are the prospects for peace? Topics vary from year to year. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POL 111 or POL 311.

POL 422 Seminar in Chinese Politics (4 hours)
This course explores the ongoing political, social and economic transformations in Communist China, with emphasis on the post-Mao era (1978 to the present). General themes include Maoist versus Dengist politics, revolution versus reform, market reform in a communist state, factionalism, central-local relations, state-society relations and China in the international order. The course also examines current political and social issues. Prerequisite: POL 121 and POL 231, or permission of the instructor.

POL 431 Seminar in Politics and Culture (4 hours)
This will be an upper level seminar in the study of the relationship of politics and culture. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the nature and difficulties of cultural study, with particular attention to ethnographic or participant observer research methods. Focus of the seminar changes yearly but has included such topics as Judaism and Jewishness, Women and Politics and Language and Politics. Prerequisite: POL 101 or junior standing.

POL 441 Seminar in Political Philosophy (4 hours)
An intensive examination of a text or theme introduced in the Political Philosophy sequence. Among the topics have been Rousseau’s Emile, Spinoza and The German Enlightenment. Offered spring semester in alternate years. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

POL 451 Internship in Politics (1-4 hours)
An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including opportunities at the Georgia State Legislature, the United States Department of State, The Carter Center and the Superior Court of Fulton County. Graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program, permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the experiential education committee. Special Topics in Drama

POL 490 Advanced Special Topics in Politics (4 hours)
A variety of courses will be offered to respond to topical needs of the curriculum. Recent courses include Moral and Political Leadership, Dealing with Diversity, Criminal Law and Citizenship in Theory and Practice. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Psychology

 PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology (4 hours)This course provides a general introduction to psychology, with an emphasis on helping students appreciate how psychologist attempt to answer questions using the scientific method. Topics within neuropsychology, learning, memory, development, clinical and social psychology are considered from an empirical point of view. Offered every semester (TU); offered twice annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment.

PSY 125 Human Sexuality (4 hours)
In this course, students will learn about the biological, psychological and social aspects of sexuality. Students will also learn about methods used in the scientific study of sex, and will gain an understanding of the diversity of human sexuality across age, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and culture. Offered every three years.

PSY 200 Independent Study in Psychology (1-4 hours)
This course provides the opportunity for an intense study of diverse topics under the direct supervision of the instructor. Prerequisites: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

PSY 201 Developmental Psychology (4 hours)
This course will focus on the current scientific thinking about human development from birth to adolescence and will integrate theoretical, research, and applied areas. Topics will include genetics and prenatal development, language acquisition, and cognitive and social development. Specific emphasis will be devoted to the social/cultural factors that may influence development. Offered annually in the spring (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 202 Organizational Psychology (4 hours)
Organizations and the individuals who function within them will be examined from the perspective of psychological theory and research. Consideration will be given both to broad topics relevant to all organizations, such as communications, groups and stress, and to topics specific to the work environment, such as employee selection, training and evaluation. Offered odd years in the spring (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 203 Learning and Conditioning (4 hours)
This course examines the empirical and theoretical issues surrounding learned behavior. Most of the data discussed come from studies in operant conditioning. Emphasis will be placed on how learning principles explain everyday human behavior and are used in the treatment of abnormal behavior patterns. Offered annually in the fall (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: PSY 101

PSY 204 Social Psychology (4 hours)
Social psychology is the study of how our thoughts, feelings and behavior are influenced by the presence of other people. The course will include a consideration of conformity, attraction, aggression, self-presentation, prejudice, helping behavior, and other relevant aspects of social life. Offered annually in the fall (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 205 Theories of Personality (4 hours)
The goal of this course is to acquaint the student with the major theories of personality and with their applications. Students will be encouraged to engage in critical analysis and theoretical comparisons of the ideas presented from diverse, and often contradictory, perspectives. Offered annually in the fall (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 206 Abnormal Psychology (4 hours)
There are three main goals in this course. The first is to enhance the student’s understanding of psychopathology and major treatment approaches. The second is to help the student learn to evaluate critically the research evidence regarding therapeutic interventions. The third is to encourage self-examination of the student’s attitudes and those of our society regarding mental illness and the full range of human individual differences. Offered annually in the spring (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 209 Behavioral Neuroscience (4 hours)
This course focuses on the relationship between biology and behavior. The anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the central nervous system will be reviewed and the current scientific evidence concerning the relationship between biology and behavior will be presented. Evidence from research involving both physiological manipulations of animals and biological and pathological insults in humans are included. Topics include: research methodology, sleep, feeding, sexual behavior, learning and memory, language, psychopathology, and plasticity. Offered annually in the fall (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisites: PSY 101.

PSY 218 Psychology and Law (4 hours)
Students completing this course will learn to apply psychological research to many processes and controversies within the legal system. Topics to be covered include accuracy of eyewitness testimony, predictions of dangerousness, false or coerced confessions, effects of pretrial publicity, and biases in sentencing. Offered every three years. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 290 Special Topics in Psychology (4 hours)
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: At least PSY 101; see individual course listing in the current semester class schedule for additional prerequisites.

PSY 300 Research Design (4 hours)
The purpose of this class is to introduce students to the research process in psychology. Students will learn both content (the process of experimentation and scientific thought) as well as how to apply this content to the examination of psychological research questions. Note that this class is specifically for those who are pursuing the B.A.L.S. degree in Psychology. Students who are pursuing the B.S. degree in Psychology must take PSY 320 and PSY 321 instead of PSY 300. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and MAT 111.

PSY 303 Psychological Testing (4 hours)
This course covers the selection, interpretation and applications of psychological tests, including tests of intellectual ability, vocational and academic aptitudes and personality. The most common uses of test results in educational institutions, clinical settings, business, government and the military will be considered. The history of psychological testing and the interpretation of test results also will be considered from both traditional and critical perspectives. Although students will have the opportunity to see many psychological tests, this course is not intended to train students actually to administer tests. Offered odd years in the spring (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and MAT 111.

PSY 307 Cognitive Psychology (4 hours)
This course explores the nature and function of human thought processes and the research methods used to study them. Discussion will focus on theories about cognitive phenomena and the assumptions on which these theories and research are based. Topics to be covered include perception, attention, memory, intelligence, problem solving and reasoning, and language. Offered even years in the fall (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 308 Sensation and Perception (4 hours)
This course explores how our sensory systems detect the physical world around us and how the brain interprets what these sensations mean. Topics covered will include psychophysical methods, signal detection theory, and the neural mechanisms underlying vision, hearing, taste, smell, and touch. Offered even years in the spring (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and PSY 209.

PSY 310 Drugs, the Brain and Behavior (4 hours)
This course examines the effects of psychoactive drugs on the central nervous system and, subsequently, behavior. Both recreational and illicit drugs and those used to treat mental disorders will be covered. In addition, the underlying brain and environmental factors thought to be responsible for drug addiction, tolerance and sensitivity, and the classification of common psychoactive drugs will be reviewed. Offered odd years in the spring (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and PSY 209.

PSY 316 Psychology Through Film (4 hours)
Through a combination of original sources and complementary films, this course reviews classic and contemporary topics within many key areas of psychology, including abnormal, biopsychology, cognitive, developmental, family systems, forensic, personality, positive, and social. Offered every three years.
Prerequisite: PSY 321.

PSY 320 Psychological Statistics and Research Methods I (4 hours)
An introduction to research methodology and corresponding statistical techniques. Topics include the scientific method, reliability, validity, basic statistics (e.g., variability, central tendency, z-scores, correlations, regression and Chi-square) and SPSS training. Students conduct a correlation experiment and learn to write an APA style research paper. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 321 Psychological Statistics and Research Methods II (4 hours)
An introduction to advanced research methods and corresponding statistical techniques. Topics include experimental methods, internal and external validity, and advanced statistics (e.g., ANOVA, repeated measure). Students conduct an experimental project and write an APA style research paper. Prerequisite: PSY 320.

PSY 322 Advanced Experimental Psychology (4 hours)
This sequel to the introductory research methods course provides students with the opportunity to design, conduct, analyze, and report the findings of an individually planned and executed research project. This intensive, semester-long project will allow students to consolidate and apply the knowledge acquired in both PSY 320 and PSY 321, as well as expose students to the real-world challenges that often accompany scientific research. Offered annually in the spring (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: PSY 321.

PSY 400 Advanced Independent Study in Psychology (1-4 hours)
This course provides the opportunity for an intense advanced study of diverse topics under the direct supervision of the instructor. Prerequisite: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

PSY 405 History and Systems of Psychology (4 hours)
This course serves as the capstone course and challenges students to synthesize information from all four years of study in psychology. A study of the historic development of modern psychology, this course covers its philosophical and scientific ancestry, the major schools of thought, the contemporary systems of psychology and their theoretical and empirical differences. Offered annually in the spring (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: Open only to senior psychology majors in their final semester/term of study.

PSY 406 Directed Research in Psychology (4 hours)
Original investigations and detailed studies of the literature in selected areas of psychology will be supervised by a faculty member. Emphasis will be on original research. Prerequisites: PSY 321 and permission of the instructor.

PSY 407 Internship in Psychology (1-4 hours)
An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including opportunities mentioned in the major overview. Graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program, permission of an internship site supervisor acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the experiential education committee.

PSY 490 Advanced Special Topics in Psychology (4 hours)
The seminar will provide examination and discussion of various topics of contemporary interest in psychology. Prerequisite: At least PSY 101; see individual course listing in the current semester class schedule for additional prerequisites.

PSY 496 Advanced Special Topics in Biopsychology (1 hour)
This course will serve as the capstone course for the Biopsychology major. This course will require students to synthesize the knowledge they have acquired during their educational career and apply it to real-world situations. Students will be encouraged to think critically about the relationship between processes that occur in the brain and human behavior. Prerequisite: open only to senior psychology majors in their final semester/term of study. Offered every spring. Cross-listed as BIO 496.

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