Course Offerings

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Course Offerings 2017-05-11T16:05:32+00:00

Below is a sample of courses offered to all students at Oglethorpe.
Courses are subject to availability and may change.

To view the most up-to-date course listings, including schedules, times and faculty, perform a course search on OASIS, our student registration system. Simply choose “OASIS GUESTS” from the main menu, then “SEARCH FOR SECTIONS”.

ACC 230 – Financial Accounting
This course is a study of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and other accounting concepts with emphasis on their application in the financial statements of business enterprises. The measurement and reporting of assets, liabilities and owners’ equity is stressed, along with the related measurement and reporting of revenue, expense and cash flow. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above or approval by the director of accounting studies.

ACC 231
Managerial Accounting
This course is a study of the use of accounting information by managers and decision makers within an economic enterprise. Cost analysis for purposes of planning and control is emphasized. Prerequisite: ACC 230.

ACC 240 – Business Law
This course provides an overview of the legal and ethical environment of business with special emphasis on the law of contracts, negotiable instruments, agency, sales and warranties, credit and secured transactions, intellectual property, business organizations, and on-line commerce. Cross-listed as ACC 240.

ACC 290 – Preparing for an Internship
An intense study of diverse accounting topics under the direct supervision of an accounting faculty member. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

ACC 290 – More for Nonprofits
An intense study of diverse accounting topics under the direct supervision of an accounting faculty member. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

ACC 332 – Intermediate Accounting
This course covers financial accounting topics at an intermediate level. The topics covered are similar to Financial Accounting but in greater depth. The standards promulgated by the Financial Accounting Standards Board are considered and evaluated. The preparation and the theoretical foundations of the financial statements are emphasized. Prerequisite: ACC 231.

ACC 333 – Intermediate Accounting
This course covers financial accounting topics at an intermediate level. The topics covered are similar to Financial Accounting but in greater depth. The standards promulgated by the Financial Accounting Standards Board are considered and evaluated. The preparation and the theoretical foundations of the financial statements are emphasized. Prerequisite: ACC 231.

ACC 334 – Cost & Managerial Accounting
This course is a more advanced study of the accounting information required for the managerial activities covered in ACC 231. The course includes the study of the analytical techniques and methodologies used to generate accounting information and the managerial use of accounting information. The topics covered include profitability analysis, cost allocation, inventory management, budgeting, relevant cost analysis, performance evaluation and pricing decisions. Prerequisite: ACC 231.

ACC 335 – Income Tax Acc.-Individuals
This course provides an overview of the federal income tax system primarily as it relates to individuals. The study of the federal tax law provides the necessary tax background for a variety of accounting, financial and managerial careers. Prerequisite: ACC 231.

ACC 436 – Accounting Control Systems
This course is an in-depth study of the application of information systems concepts to the accounting environment. Emphasis is on the processing of data in a computerized environment as well as the controls that are necessary to assure accuracy and reliability of the data processed by an accounting system. Practical implications of accounting information system design and implementation will be investigated through the use of cases and projects. Prerequisites: ACC 231 and CSC 101.

ART 101 – Intro to Drawing
This course is an introductory-level studio course which will focus on mastering the fundamentals of drawing. Working from observation in line and value, students will develop an understanding of form and shape; volume and flatness; spatial relationships; the basics of perspective and composition; the materials and techniques of drawing.

ART 102 – Intro to Painting
This course is an introductory-level studio course which will focus on understanding and mastering the fundamentals of painting. Working from observation, this includes developing an understanding of color and color relationship; form and shape; volume and flatness; the basics of composition; the materials and techniques of oil painting.

ART 105 – Video Production
This course will introduce students to the techniques and tools of basic video production. Students will learn to think visually and consider lighting, color, composition and movement as they relate to production. The importance of sound and how the audible and the visual components support and complement each other will be considered. Students will have the opportunity to work with video editing software. This course is also cross listed as CRS 115.

ART 109 – Intro to Photography
Laboratory exercises, in-class lectures, critiques and assignments are designed to develop an understanding of all aspects of traditional black and white photography, including composition and self expression. Emphasis will be on development of technical skills and aesthetic direction in photography. Prerequisite: A fully manual camera – to be brought to the first class meeting.

ART 202 – Intermediate Painting
This course is an introductory-level studio course which will focus on understanding and mastering the fundamentals of painting. Working from observation, this includes developing an understanding of color and color relationship; form and shape; volume and flatness; the basics of composition; the materials and techniques of oil painting.

ART 260 – Ancient Art History
This course will cover the art and archaeology of the area around the Mediterranean Sea before the fall of Rome, commonly called the ancient world. The course will examine the mythology and religion of each culture, using primary sources such as artifacts and ancient literature. Cultures covered will include Mesopotamia, Egypt, Bronze Age Crete, Greece and Rome. Prerequisite: COR 104.

ART 290 ST – Directing Film/Digital Cinema
Studio exercises, in-studio lectures, outside assignments and critiques are designed to develop a basic understanding of various media, including printmaking and various specialties of artists-in-residence.

ART 290 ST – Intermediate Digital Photography
Studio exercises, in-studio lectures, outside assignments and critiques are designed to develop a basic understanding of various media, including printmaking and various specialties of artists-in-residence.

ART 290 ST – Altern. Processes in Photography
Studio exercises, in-studio lectures, outside assignments and critiques are designed to develop a basic understanding of various media, including printmaking and various specialties of artists-in-residence.

ART 302 – Advanced Printmaking
tudents will build upon prior experiences in Intermediate Painting and be guided to set parameters for individual inquiry in their work. Emphasis will be on personal imagery and control of formal issues to express the students’ ideas. Each student will be expected to develop ideas and themes in a cohesive body of work. Prerequisite: ART 202.

ART 350 – Modern Art History
This course will examine major movements in the visual arts from the end of the 19th century to the present, focusing primarily on Europe and America. The student will be expected to explore connections between visual culture and broader historical trends and be able to recognize, understand and discuss the important works of art of the 20th century. It is recommended that students take COR 104 before taking this course.

BIO 101 – General Biology
General Biology I, along with General Biology II, is an introduction to modern biology and considers the principles of the biological sciences from an integrated viewpoint. The general orientation of this course is toward the molecular and cellular basis of life. The specific topics covered are biochemistry, cell biology, genetics and evolution. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: Satisfaction of the mathematics placement requirement (Sec. 5.4.1. and Sec. 5.4.2.). BIO 101 must precede BIO 102 and it is recommended that the courses be completed in consecutive semesters. Students who are majoring in biology and biopsychology must earn a grade of “C-” or higher in BIO 101 before enrolling in BIO 102 or any other biology course.

BIO 201 – Genetics
An introduction to the study of inheritance. Classical patterns of Mendelian inheritance are explored and related to modern molecular genetics, human genetic disorders, ethics and issues of conservation. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 102 and CHM 102 (with laboratory, CHM 102L); a grade of “C-“ or higher must be earned in both BIO 102 and CHM 102. Prerequisites or co-requisites: CHM 201 or permission from the instructor. Declared Biopsychology majors who have completed the BIO 102 and CHM 102 prerequisites and have taken, or plan to co-enroll in, PSY 209 will be granted permission to register for BIO 201.

BIO 301 – Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
This course is an intensive study of the structural aspects of selected vertebrate types. These organisms are studied in relation to their evolution and development. The laboratory involves detailed examination of representative vertebrate specimens. Prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 201, CHM 201 (with laboratory, CHM 201L). Junior or senior standing and co-registration in BIO 201 and CHM 201 (with laboratory, CHM 201L) may be acceptable with the permission of the instructor. A grade of “C-” or higher must be earned in each of the prerequisite courses.

BIO 380 – Conservation Biology
Conservation Biology is an interdisciplinary science that attempts to protect and restore biodiversity by describing its spatial and temporal patterns, identifying its threats, and removing its threats. This course covers these goals, philosophies underlying the science, and relevant public policy with lectures, readings, exercises, and research. Some exercises require travel around Atlanta and Georgia.

BIO 490 ST – Advanced Evolution Seminar
This course includes offerings of advanced, new courses and seminars and advanced, one-time courses and seminars on select biological topics. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and any additional requirements listed in the current semester course schedule.

BUS 240 – Business Law
This course provides an overview of the legal and ethical environment of business with special emphasis on the law of contracts, negotiable instruments, agency, sales and warranties, credit and secured transactions, intellectual property, business organizations, and on-line commerce. Cross-listed as ACC 240.

BUS 260 – Principles of Management
This course is an introduction to the principles of management and administration. It includes the study of leadership, conflict resolution, decision making and the general functions of management in large and small organizations. Students will use computers extensively to do active research and will learn spreadsheet and graphical tools to aid in the development of their decision-making skills

BUS 310 – Corporate Finance
This course is a study of the basic principles of organizational finance and its relation to other aspects of business management and to the economic environment within which the firm operates. Attention is given to basic financial concepts, techniques of financial analysis, sources of funding, asset management, capital budgeting, capital structure, cost of capital, time value of money and financial decision making under conditions of uncertainty. Prerequisites: ACC 231, MAT 111, and math requirement for Business majors.

BUS 350 – Marketing
This course is concerned with the policies and problems involved in the operation of market institutions. It will examine broad principles and concepts involved in the operation of market planning, market segmentation, consumer behavior, product management and pricing, distribution and promotion of goods and services. Aspects of global marketing, current marketing topics and ethical and social responsibility issues in marketing are addressed. Prerequisites: Junior standing required (49 or more completed hours)

BUS 382 – Management Labor Relations
This course will explore the dynamic relationship between management and organized labor. The major topics to be covered include the history of the American labor movement, labor legislation, collective bargaining, grievance procedures, arbitration and unionization in the public sector. Prerequisite: BUS 260.

BUS 411 – Investments
This course is an introduction to the environment in which investment decisions are made. Topics explored will include efficient markets, the capital asset pricing model, term structure of interest rates, risk versus return and performance measures. Although the emphasis will be on stocks and bonds, other investments will be discussed. Prerequisite: BUS 310.

BUS 451 – Direct & Interactive Marketing
This course is designed to introduce the student to the specialized field of interactive marketing which uses all media to affect a measurable consumer response. Topics to be explored include direct marketing planning, mailing lists and databases, media selection, techniques for creating and producing direct response campaigns, internet marketing and managing the interactive marketing operation. Prerequisite: BUS 350.

CHM 101 – General Chemistry
An introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry, including a study of the theories of the structure of atoms and molecules and the nature of the chemical bond; the properties of gases, liquids and solids; the rates and energetics of chemical reactions; the properties of solutions; chemical equilibrium; electro-chemistry and the chemical behavior of representative elements. Prerequisites: MAT 102 and MAT 103 with a grade of “C-” or higher in each course. Corequisites: CHM 101L and CHM 102L. A grade of “C-” or higher must be earned in CHM 101 before taking CHM 102.

CHM 101 L – General Chemistry & Lab
An introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry, including a study of the theories of the structure of atoms and molecules and the nature of the chemical bond; the properties of gases, liquids and solids; the rates and energetics of chemical reactions; the properties of solutions; chemical equilibria; electro-chemistry and the chemical behavior of representative elements. Prerequisites: MAT 102 and MAT 103 with a grade of “C-” or higher in each course. Corequisites: CHM 101L and CHM 102L. A grade of “C-” or higher must be earned in CHM 101 before taking CHM 102.

CHM 201 – Organic Chemistry
An introductory course in the principles and theories of organic chemistry. The structure, preparation and reactions of various functional groups will be investigated. Emphasis will be on synthesis and reaction mechanisms. Prerequisites: CHM 101 and CHM 102 with a grade of C- or higher in each course. Corequisites: CHM 201L and CHM 202L. A grade of C- or higher must be earned in CHM 201 before taking CHM 202.

CHM 201 L – Organic Chemistry & Lab
The laboratory course is designed to complement CHM 201 and CHM 202. Various techniques, such as distillation, extraction and purification, are studied in the first semester. The second semester involves synthesis and identification of a variety of organic compounds. Corequisites: CHM 201 and CHM 202.

CHM 301 – Physical Chemistry
A systematic study of the foundations of chemistry. Particular attention is paid to thermodynamics, including characterization of gases, liquids, solids and solutions of electrolytes and nonelectrolytes; the First, Second and Third Laws; spontaneity and equilibrium; phase diagrams and one- and two-component systems; electrochemistry; an introduction to the kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. Additionally, both phenomenological and mechanistic kinetics are presented, as is a brief introduction to quantum mechanics. Prerequisites: MAT 233, CHM 202 and PHY 102 with a grade of “C-” or higher in each course. Co-requisites: CHM 301L, CHM 302L.

CHM 301 L – Physical Chemistry & Lab
Intended to complement the Physical Chemistry lecture courses, these courses provide the student with an introduction to physico-chemical experimentation. Co-requisites: CHM 301, CHM 302.

COR 101 – Narratives of Self I
The first-year course sequence investigates narratives of the self. Among the topics that students will consider are a variety of fictional and philosophical constructions of the self, the relationships of memory to personal identity and the disjunction or harmony between public and private selves. The authors considered in the courses may include Homer, Socrates, St. Augustine, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Descartes, Cervantes, Lao Tsu, Nietzsche and Toni Morrison.

COR 103 – Music & Culture
The appreciation of music begins with an understanding of the creative process as a means of self-expression and the artists relationship to the world. Using primary sources, guest lecturers and artists, this course examines the styles, trends and developments of Western and international music from early civilizations through the 20th century. Study and discussion begin to develop an understanding of how music and the cultural arts reflect and affect societal trends and values.

COR 104 – Art & Culture
Through the study of art this course will help students understand the basic chronology of Western culture, lay the groundwork for broad cultural literacy and look at how art reflects the human condition. The course explores content, formal elements and historical context of the art of Western and non-Western cultures from ancient to modern times. Four basic themes will prevail: Art and Religion, Art and Power, Art and Nature and Art and the Personal.

COR 201 – Human Nature & the Social Order
The sophomore course sequence focuses on the relationship between individuals and communities, examining the extent to which the good life can be pursued within the confines of any social order. These courses investigate issues such as the nature of human excellence and virtue, the character of justice, the origins and sources of social order and the status and legitimacy of political power. How can we obtain an accurate description of humans as social beings? What is the good society, and how may it be realized? Students in this course are invited to become more thoughtful, self-conscious and self-critical members and citizens of the society and polity in which they live. Authors such as Aristotle, Locke, Smith, Tocqueville, Marx and Weber are read.

COR 203 – Great Ideas of Modern Math
This course explores major modern mathematical developments and helps students to understand the unique approach to knowledge employed by mathematics. The course is organized around three major mathematical ideas that have emerged since the time of Sir Isaac Newton. These three ideas may be drawn from: game theory, graph theory, knot theory, logic, mathematics of finance, modern algebra, non-Euclidean geometry, number theory, probability, set theory and the different sizes of infinity, and topology. Students will learn how to solve basic problems in the three areas covered by the course and how to present their solutions concisely, coherently, and rigorously. Offered every semester.

COR 301 – Historical Pers. On the Social Order
The junior year sequence constitutes an historical examination of human experience in response to some of the themes and issues raised in the first two years of the core. Drawing on a variety of perspectives from both the humanities and the social sciences, the course strives to reconstruct the histories of significant periods in human history. The first semester focuses on the rise and fall of civilizations from antiquity through the Renaissance. The second semester concentrates on the problems of modernity, such as the rise of the modern state, nationalism, revolution and globalization. Both courses examine the ways in which significant moments have become essential parts of our historical consciousness, enshrined in myth, and religion, tradition, culture, and institutions. Through careful analysis of current scholarship and original sources, students are invited to consider the complex relationship between history, cultural traditions and the social and political institutions derived from them.

COR 401 – Science & Human Nature: Biology
The senior year course deals with the way scientific methodologies inform current thinking on the nature of the human organism. Starting from basic genetic and psychological understandings, it emphasizes how evolutionary mechanisms may be seen as contributing to the origins of uniquely human behaviors. Elements of DNA structure as it applies to information storage and transmission, the regulation of gene expression and the mechanics of protein synthesis, mutation and its centrality in producing variation, sexual reproduction and how the laws of probability apply to biological systems, sex determination, altruistic behavior and kin selection are among the topics explored.

COR 402 – Science & Human Nature: Physical Science
Modern Western society is largely science-dominated and the consideration of science and its role in society is essential for any educated person. This Core course investigates the practice of science by focusing specifically on scientific revolutions. It is during such periods of upheaval that we can most clearly see how science is actually practiced. What causes a new idea to challenge the scientific status quo? What determines whether the new idea will be accepted or not? When seeking new explanations for natural events, what guides the scientist’s search? The goal of this course is to equip the student with the necessary tools and background to seek answers to these questions and others, for such questions are increasingly a part of each of our lives if we live those lives reflectively.

CRS 101 – Theories of Communication & Rhetoric
This gateway course to the major is designed to establish a broad understanding of various theories used in communication and rhetoric studies. Students will learn theories about messages themselves as well as the various contexts in which they occur: interpersonal communication, public communication, mass communication, intercultural and gendered communication and organizational communication. The ethical implications of these theories will also be considered.

CRS 110 – Public Speaking
This course is designed to develop and enhance students’ ability to communicate effectively to any audience. Students will deliver both prepared and impromptu speeches. They will give humorous and inspirational speeches as well as informational speeches focusing on organization and the use of visual aids. Students develop all the tools necessary to effectively communicate – their voice, their gestures, their body language and their eye contact. They will receive timely written and oral feedback from the instructor. Speeches will be videotaped and critiqued. The goal is to become a more polished and confident speaker. Prerequisite: Students who speak English as a second language must have permission of the instructor.

CRS 115 – Video Production
This course will introduce students to the techniques and tools of basic video production. Students will learn to think visually and consider lighting, color, composition and movement as they relate to production. The importance of sound and how audible and visual components support and complement each other will be considered. Students will have the opportunity to work with video editing software. This course is also cross listed as ART 105.

CRS 201 – Intro to Programming
This course introduces the student to the fundamental techniques of problem solving and algorithm construction. The student will design, test, and complete several substantial programming projects. Topics include data types, file manipulation, methods, parameters, visibility, classes, control structures, arrays, enumerated types, object-oriented programming, inheritance, polymorphism, and basic software design and testing. The computer language used in the course will be at the discretion of the instructor but is usually Java. Offered every fall semester.

CRS 220 – Investigative Writing
Emphasis will be on learning a wide range of research techniques and purposefully presenting information to a variety of audiences in appropriate format and style. Students will be asked to define their own investigative projects and to analyze and revise their own writing. Prerequisite: CRS 1712 with a grade of “C-” or higher.

CRS 240 – Journalism
This course teaches the fundamentals of journalistic news writing and reporting. Using a range of techniques from interviews to internet research, students will learn how to gather information from a variety of sources and write stories using different types of leads, endings and structures. They will also engage in a critique of today’s journalistic practices. Offered Fall semesters.

CRS 290 ST – New Media & Journalism
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

CRS 290 ST – Interpersonal Communication
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

CRS 290 ST – Media & Body Image
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

CRS 320 – Persuasive Writing
This course is designed to develop sophisticated strategies of persuasion for analyzing and generating arguments responsive to targeted audiences in a variety of contexts, including civic, professional and academic. Students will learn both classical and contemporary strategies of persuasion. Emphasis will be on presenting clear, coherent and logical arguments. Students will be asked to define their own projects within assigned contexts. Students will evaluate their own and others’ writing to enable the revision process. This course is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors only. It is offered in the fall semester. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102.

CRS 470 – Globalization & the Media
The rapid evolution of communication technologies has increased the ability of global media corporations to reach audiences around the world. This course examines the political, economic and cultural dimensions of media globalization. Topics covered include cultural imperialism, global media corporations, international trade organizations and regulatory bodies, global advertising and cultural protectionism. Offered alternate fall semesters. Prerequisite: CRS 101 or permission of the instructor.

CRS 490 – Advanced New Media in Society
This advanced course will examine selected topics in rhetoric, communications or media studies, such as Civic Literacy; Global Culture and Rhetoric; Political Rhetoric. This course may be taken more than once. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

CSC 101 – Spreadsheets & Databases
Formerly titled “Data Manipulation Software.” This course introduces the use of spreadsheet and database software to organize, manage, present and make calculations from data. The course is designed for accounting, business and economics majors; however, other students are welcome. The course uses the Microsoft Office software suite.

CSC 290 ST – Behind Computing Curtain
This course provides an introductory examination of a contemporary topic in computing and/or emerging technologies. The topic will vary from offering to offering. Possible topics include basic simulation, ethics in computing, information systems, and web design. This course may be taken more than once provided that the topic is different. Offered irregularly.

ECO 120 – Principles of Microeconomics
Application of economic principles to economic problems; the theory of production; income distribution; agriculture/government regulation of business; labor organizations; international trade/elementary microeconomic models.

ECO 122 – Principles of Macroeconomics
The changing economic system with its developing problems is studied from the simple circumstances of Colonial times, through the emergent industrialism of the middle period, to the complex, specialized, and diverse conditions of today. This includes an introductory survey of aggregate economic principles. The scope and method of economics, basic supply and demand theory, and national income theory are intermeshed.

ECO 220 – Intermediate Microeconomics
This course develops the economic principles necessary to analyze and interpret the decisions of individuals and firms with respect to consumption, investment, production, pricing and hiring. The principles are used to understand the behavior of business firms and public policy-making institutions. Prerequisites: ECO 121 and MAT 121.

ECO 320 – Economic Development
This course is a study of the economic, social and political factors that account for the contrast between the economic stagnation in much of the world and the steadily rising incomes in the United States, Europe and Japan. General principles are applied to the development experience of selected countries in the historically less-developed world and the formerly centrally-planned economies of Eastern and Central Europe. Prerequisite: ECO 120 or ECO 122.

ECO 326 – U.S. Economic History
This course will study the origin and growth of the American economic system from pre-colonial through the 20th century. The course traces the development of the evolution of American agricultural, commercial, manufacturing, financial, labor, regulatory and technological sectors. Prerequisite: ECO 120 or ECO 122.

ENG 101 – Ancient Literature
This course will examine the literature of the ancient world. Although the primary focus will typically be on Greek and Roman literature, Hebrew culture and/or non-Western materials may also be studied. Works and authors might include: Homer, Aristophanes, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Plautus, Terence, Seneca, Petronius, Ovid, and Virgil. Offered every fall.

ENG 103 – 18th & 19th Century Literature
Authors in this course might include: Defoe, Pope, Basho, Austen, Emerson, Twain and George Eliot. Offered every fall.

ENG 104 – Modern & Contemporary Literature
This course will investigate the literature of the 20th century. Authors might include: T.S. Eliot, Woolf, Lawrence, Frost, Morrison and Marquez. Offered every spring.

ENG 201 – Chaucer
Students will learn to read and appreciate the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, the first great English poet, in his original language; to enjoy the rich and varied nature of his works—to appreciate why he is called “the Father of English.” Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course. Offered every other year.

ENG 290 ST – African American Literature
Course description not available

ENG 290 ST – Screenwriting
Course description not available

ENG 290 ST – Amer. Short Story
Course description not available

ENG 320 – Modern Poetry & Death of God
Following the late 19th-century message that “God is dead,” modern-era poets, including T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, Rainer Maria Rilke and William Carlos Williams, tried to find what Stevens called, “the satisfactions of belief,” writing poems of “the mind in the act of finding what will suffice.” Selections from these will be studied, along with samplings from a larger group of poets after 1950, to try to see how these writers see and create meaning in their world, often under adverse circumstances. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102.

ENG 330 – Writing Poetry
In weekly assignments students will try free verse and various forms in the effort to discover and to embody more and more truly what they have to say. Much time will be spent reading published poets, responding to student work in class and trying to generate language that reveals rather than explains intangible “meanings.” Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102.

ENG 390 ST – Masterpieces of Drama
Drama as literature and genre, through survey and period studies. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course.

ENG 393 ST – History of English Language
Courses relating literature with aspects of social and intellectual history or a particular issue or theme. Possible offerings may include women in literature, American civilization, African-American (or other ethnic) literature, popular culture, the literature of a single decade, children’s literature and myth and folklore in literature. Usually offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course.

ENG 395 ST – Princes/Courtesans/ Hermit
An intensive study of between one and five British or American authors. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course.

ENG 395 ST – French & Spanish Crossroads
An intensive study of between one and five British or American authors. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course.

FRE 101 – Elementary French
This course is beginning college French, designed to present a sound foundation in understanding, speaking, reading and writing contemporary French. Prerequisite: None for FRE 101; FRE 101 or placement by testing required for FRE 102.

FRE 201 – Intermediate French
This course involves further practice in developing oral and written skills. Introduction to a variety of unedited French texts will be included. Prerequisite:

FRE 302 – French Lyric & Literary Prose
Selected texts from French literature are studied as examples of prose, poetry and drama. Students will read original works from the French classical and modern periods. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRE 301 or placement by testing.

FRE 406 – French & Spanish Crossroads
This course uses Spanish- and French-speaking countries in proximity to each other in the Caribbean or Africa as a point of departure for literary, cultural, social and service learning exploration. Offerings may focus upon Haiti and the Dominican Republic, Martinique and Cuba, Equatorial Guinea in relation to Senegal or other appropriate pairings. The course is taught in English and students without advanced skills in French or Spanish may register. Cross-listed as SPN 406. Prerequisite: FRE 301 for French major or minor credit; SPN 301 for Spanish major or minor credit.

GER 101 – Elementary German
This course is beginning college German, designed to develop the ability to understand, speak, read and write contemporary German. Prerequisite: None for GER 101; GER 101 or placement by testing required for GER 102.

GER 201 – Intermediate German
This course will be conducted as supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisites: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the registrar’s office no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy

HIS 101 – Foundations of the West
This course explores the foundations and development of Western civilizations from late antiquity to the end of the seventeenth century. The focus of the course will be on the methods and sources used by historians to uncover the history of this period, with special emphasis on such issues as the development of language, culture, political institutions, and social structures. Offered every fall. [E,1,2]

HIS 130 – U.S. History to 1865
A survey from Colonial times to 1865, concerned mainly with the major domestic developments of a growing nation. Offered alternate years. [A,3]

HIS 214 – The Age of Empire & Nation
The six decades following the revolutions of 1848 were a period of remarkable power, prosperity and creativity in Europe. New nation-states (Germany and Italy) were formed; old multiethnic empires (Russia and Austria-Hungary) seemed rejuvenated; and Europeans acquired immense colonial empires. Meanwhile, industrialization and modern science and art revolutionized European life and thought. However, this fusion of cultural and economic modernity with social and political conservatism concealed grave weaknesses that would lead, beginning in 1914, to the upheavals of world war, communism and fascism. Offered every three years. [E,3]

HIS 290 ST – European Imperialism 19/20th century
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

HIS 290 ST – Intro to Public History
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

HIS 290 ST – History Of Georgia
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

HIS 331 – Age of Affluence: U.S. since 1965
An interdisciplinary study of American life since World War II, this course will emphasize political, economic and social developments. Foreign policy is considered principally with respect to its impact on domestic affairs. Offered alternate years.

HIS 340 – Dictatorship & Democracy in Latin America
This course will examine the roots, character and impact of authoritarian rule – and resulting resistance movements – in Latin America. Included will be a look at the caudillos that competed for power after independence, the Liberal dictatorships of the late 19th century, the Depression Dictators of the 1930s, Populist dictators of the 1940s and 1950s and the rise of military-bureaucratic dictatorships in the 1960s and 1970s. An understanding will be sought for why almost all political orientations (Republicanism, Liberalism, nationalism, Populism and Communism) offered up a dictator as their champion at some point in Latin American history and how Latin American nations have been able to make a transition to democracy. Finally, consideration will be given to how dictatorships affect the everyday lives and perceptions of the people living under them and in their aftermath. Offered alternate years. [L,3] Prerequisite: HIS 240 or permission of the instructor.

HIS 490 ST – Gender in Modern Europe
Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered generally for juniors or seniors as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

HIS 490 ST – Advanced Gender in Modern Europe
Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered generally for juniors or seniors as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

HON 101 – Intro Honors: World Myths
This seminar introduces first-year prospective honors students to the honors program by combining the features of the HON 201 seminars with a general introduction and overview to the aims and features of the program. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

HON 101 – Intro Honors: World Cinema
This seminar introduces first-year prospective honors students to the honors program by combining the features of the HON 201 seminars with a general introduction and overview to the aims and features of the program. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

HON 101 – Campaigns/Elections
This seminar introduces first-year prospective honors students to the honors program by combining the features of the HON 201 seminars with a general introduction and overview to the aims and features of the program. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

HON 201 – Honor Seminar-Intellectual Imposters
This seminar, led by faculty members from two substantively and conceptually different disciplines, considers a question, problem, proposition, text, period of time, project, etc. The seminar focuses on student research, writing and presentations and emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach. Two semesters of HON 201 Honors Seminar are required. Graded with a letter grade, “A” through “F.” Prerequisite: Application and admission into the honors program.

HON 301 – Honors I
In this course, with the aid of a faculty supervisor, the student selects and begins to research a thesis topic. A preliminary prospectus is developed along with a reading list. The student attends a series of research skills sessions. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the director of the honors program and the faculty supervisor, a 3.3 cumulative grade-point average and a 3.5 cumulative grade-point average in the field in which the honors research is to be conducted. Specific disciplines may have additional expectations for successful completion of an honors thesis in that area. Please see specific discipline/major webpages or faculty for details.

HON 401 – Honors III
Under continued direction of the faculty supervisor, intensive research of the thesis topic is undertaken in this course. Preparation of a first draft is submitted to the student’s reading committee. Graded with a letter grade, “A” through “F.” Prerequisite: Completion of HON 302 with a grade of “S” (Satisfactory).

INT 290 – Intro to Arts management
These courses will focus on materials and topics that transcend the boundaries of specific academic disciplines and are not offered on a regular basis. Such courses have included Bioethics; Environmental Science; Art of the Film I and II; Film Adaptations of Novels.

INT 290 ST – Strategic Planning for Digital Content
Content is the text, images, audio, video, and other “stuff” that makes up the internet. This course teaches the theory and practice of planning the right content for the right people at the right time. You will: learn the business value of quality digital content; know the academic and industry disciplines that inform content strategy; understand and apply the core principles to make content influential; and learn the basic skills for planning content during a digital project.

JPN 101 – Elementary Japanese
This is a one-year course sequence in beginning Japanese aimed at developing basic skills in speaking, reading, writing and aural comprehension. The kana and kanji writing systems are introduced. Prerequisite: None for JPN 101; JPN 101 or placement by testing for JPN 102.

JPN 201 – Intermediate Japanese
A continuation of elementary Japanese, the first semester of the second-year sequence focuses on conversational skills and vocabulary building and extends the student’s proficiency in reading and writing. Aspects of the Japanese culture and society are also explored. Prerequisite: JPN 102 or permission of the instructor.

JPN 250 – Princes, Courtesans, Hermit
This course is designed to provide students with a survey of Japanese literature from classical to modern times. Readings include selections from creation myths, court romances and poetic diaries, Buddhist folk tales, the haiku and travel writings of Basho, Saikaku’s Five Women Who Loved Love, the puppet drama Tale of the 47 Samurai and modern works by Mori Ogai, Soseki Natsume and Tanizaki Junichiro. All readings are in English translation.

MAT 111 – Statistics
This course includes descriptive and inferential statistics with particular emphasis upon parametric statistics, rules of probability, interval estimation and hypothesis testing. Distributions that will be discussed include the normal, chi-square and t-distribution. Additional topics include analysis of variance, regression and correlation analysis, goodness-of-fit and tests for independence.

MAT 120 – Intro to Functions
The objective of this course is to equip students with the algebraic reasoning and skills for MAT 121/Applied Calculus or MAT 130/Advanced Functions. The function concept is developed in algebraic, graphical and numerical forms, with attention to rates of change, domain, range and inverses. The following categories of functions are discussed in terms of their analytic, graphical, and numerical properties: linear, quadratic, other polynomials, power, rational, exponential, and logarithmic. The course includes modeling of the real-world data with these functions. Offered every fall semester.

MAT 121 – Applied Calculus
This is the recommended calculus course for students in accounting, business, economics and the social sciences. The goal of this course is to present calculus in an intuitive yet intellectually satisfying way and to illustrate the many applications of calculus to those students’ fields. Topics include functions, rates of change, the derivative, techniques of differentiation (exact and approximate), optimization and other applications of the derivative, integration, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, applications of integration, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, and multivariable optimization (Second Derivatives Test and Lagrange multipliers). Offered every semester. Pre-Requisite: MAT 120 with a grade of “C-” or higher OR by placement

MAT 131 – Calculus I
Calculus I, II, III, and IV form the recommended calculus sequence for students in mathematics and the sciences. The objective of these courses is to introduce the fundamental ideas of differential and integral calculus as they pertain to functions of both one and several variables. Topics for Calculus I include limits, continuity, rates of change, derivatives, the Mean Value Theorem, applications of the derivative, related rates, optimization problems, introduction to area and integration, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Offered every fall semester. Pre-Requisite: MAT 130 with a grade of “C-” or higher OR by placement

MAT 233 – Calculus III
This course is a continuation of Calculus II. Topics include the basic geometry of Euclidean 3-space (vectors, lines, planes), vector functions/curves (limits, derivatives, and integrals), and multivariable functions (limits, partial derivatives, and double integrals). Offered every fall semester. Pre-Requisite: MAT 132 with a grade of “C-” or higher

MAT 241 – Proof & Logic
This course serves as a general introduction to advanced mathematics. As such, it will consider various methods of proof communicated through good mathematical communication (both written and oral). Topics are drawn from logic, set theory, functions, relations, combinatorics, graph theory, and Boolean algebra. Offered every fall semester. Prerequisite: MAT 132 with a grade of “C-” or higher

MAT 361 – Probability
This course provides a calculus-based study of probability. Topics include set-theoretic, axiomatic and combinatorial foundations, basic rules, conditional probability, independence, discrete and continuous random variable theory, special discrete and continuous models, probability plots, and joint distributions. Offered the fall semester of even years. Prerequisite: MAT 132 with grade C- or higher.

MUS 134 – University Singers
This is the University’s auditioned, mixed-voice concert choir. It is the primary musical ensemble for the study and performance of choral music, both accompanied and unaccompanied, from the renaissance to the present. The University Chorale chamber choir is chosen by audition from members of the University Singers. Offered every semester. Prerequisites: An audition and permission of the instructor/conductor.

MUS 136 – Applied Inst.-Instrumental
The study, practice and performance of techniques and literature on an individual basis. The following areas of private lessons are available: Instrumental (strings, brass and woodwinds); Piano; Voice; Guitar; and Harpsichord. Provides one thirty-minute lesson per week; the semester may culminate in a jury exam if deemed appropriate by the instructor. The instructor determines level of study (beginning, intermediate or advanced) and sets appropriate goals. Offered every semester. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or the director of music.

MUS 136 – Applied Inst.-Piano
The study, practice and performance of techniques and literature on an individual basis. The following areas of private lessons are available: Instrumental (strings, brass and woodwinds); Piano; Voice; Guitar; and Harpsichord. Provides one thirty-minute lesson per week; the semester may culminate in a jury exam if deemed appropriate by the instructor. The instructor determines level of study (beginning, intermediate or advanced) and sets appropriate goals. Offered every semester. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or the director of music.

MUS 136 – Applied Inst- Voice
The study, practice and performance of techniques and literature on an individual basis. The following areas of private lessons are available: Instrumental (strings, brass and woodwinds); Piano; Voice; Guitar; and Harpsichord. Provides one thirty-minute lesson per week; the semester may culminate in a jury exam if deemed appropriate by the instructor. The instructor determines level of study (beginning, intermediate or advanced) and sets appropriate goals. Offered every semester. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or the director of music.

MUS 136 – Applied Inst- Guitar
The study, practice and performance of techniques and literature on an individual basis. The following areas of private lessons are available: Instrumental (strings, brass and woodwinds); Piano; Voice; Guitar; and Harpsichord. Provides one thirty-minute lesson per week; the semester may culminate in a jury exam if deemed appropriate by the instructor. The instructor determines level of study (beginning, intermediate or advanced) and sets appropriate goals. Offered every semester. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or the director of music.

MUS 136 – Applied Inst- Harp
The study, practice and performance of techniques and literature on an individual basis. The following areas of private lessons are available: Instrumental (strings, brass and woodwinds); Piano; Voice; Guitar; and Harpsichord. Provides one thirty-minute lesson per week; the semester may culminate in a jury exam if deemed appropriate by the instructor. The instructor determines level of study (beginning, intermediate or advanced) and sets appropriate goals. Offered every semester. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or the director of music.

MUS 144 – OU Concert Winds
Oglethorpe Concert Winds is a general curriculum course that includes woodwinds, brass and percussion. The ensemble studies and performs standard collegiate wind ensemble literature and is open to all students with band or orchestra experience. For exceptional players this requirement may be waived. Those without an instrument may make arrangements for rental through the University. The Oglethorpe Pep Band is drawn from members of the OU Concert Winds. Offered every semester. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

MUS 290 – Fundamentals Music Theory Notation
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum such as Brass or String Ensemble; Fundamentals of Music; Basic Techniques of Conducting; Keyboard Accompanying; Studies in Jazz, etc. Prerequisite: see individual course listings in the current semester course schedule.

MUS 290 ST – Women in Music
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum such as Brass or String Ensemble; Fundamentals of Music; Basic Techniques of Conducting; Keyboard Accompanying; Studies in Jazz, etc. Prerequisite: see individual course listings in the current semester course schedule.

NPM 220 – The Nonprofit Sector
Through both readings and field experience in nonprofits, students will explore the nonprofit sector beginning with the mission of nonprofits. The traditional function of any business will be explored with the functions specific to nonprofits such as fund development and the management of volunteers. Current topics in nonprofits including connected capitalism will be included. Professional development of students is emphasized. Course serves as the introductory course to the Nonprofit Management minor.

PHI 101 – What is Philosophy?
This course introduces students to philosophy through some of the major works in philosophy’s history. Socrates’ dictum “… an unexamined life is not worth living” will be taken as the motto. Philosophy, in other words, is not just a way of thinking, but a way of life that requires examination of ideas and the world in which we live with clarity and courage. Offered every fall.

PHI 202 – Ethical Theory
In this course, students will read several contemporary works concerning the nature of the ethical. Works will be drawn from both the analytic and the Continental traditions and an effort will be made to put the two traditions into dialogues with each other. Offered biennially in the spring.

PHI 206 – Early Modern Philosophy
The early modern period (early 1600s to mid-1700s) is one of the most fertile in philosophy’s history and the period when many of philosophy’s central themes and methods come to be most clearly articulated. The goal in this course will be to acquire a basic understanding of the thought of the continental Rationalist (of particular note will be their views on the nature, sources, and extent of knowledge and their views on metaphysics [the study of reality in its broadest and most general terms]). Their views are interesting in themselves but also essential to the study of more recent philosophy and helpful in gaining a sense of the intellectual life of early modern Europe. Offered biennially in the spring.

PHI 307 – Existentialism
Existentialism has a gloomy reputation, and that reputation is wholly undeserved. Far from being a moody, angst-ridden meditation on the futility of human existence, existentialism is focused on everyday experience and on the extent to which philosophical reflection always and already takes place in the context of a world. It seeks to illustrate the task, as Merleau-Ponty has it, “not of explaining the world or of discovering its conditions of possibility, but of formulating an experience off the world.” It’s on this notion of a formulation of experience that this course will concentrate, focusing mainly on Sartre’s Being and Nothingness. Offered biennially in the fall. Prerequisites: two courses in philosophy or permission of the instructor.

PHY 101 – General Physics
An introductory course without calculus. Fundamental aspects of mechanics, fluids, waves, thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, optics and modern physics. The text will be on the level of Serway and Faughtn, College Physics. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: MAT 103; PHY 101 must precede PHY 102. Corequisites: PHY 101L and PHY 102L.

PHY 101 – Intro Physics Lab
Introductory physics laboratories to accompany PHY 101, 102, 201 and 202.

PHY 201 – College Physics
Introductory physics with calculus. Subject matter is the same as in general physics but on a level more suited to physics majors, engineering majors, etc. One year of calculus as a prerequisite is preferred, otherwise calculus must be taken concurrently. The text will be on the level of Halliday, Resnick and Walker, Fundamentals of Physics. Prerequisite: PHY 201 with a grade of C- or higher must precede PHY 202. Corequisites: PHY 101L and PHY 102L.

PHY 211 – Classical Mechanics
This is the student’s first introduction to theoretical physics. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods are developed with Newton’s laws of motion and applied to a variety of contemporary problems. Emphasis is placed on problem work, the object being to develop physical intuition and facility for translating physical problems into mathematical terms. The text will be on the level of Analytical Mechanics by Fowles. Prerequisites: MAT 132 and PHY 202 with a grade of “C-” or higher in each course. A grade of “C-” or higher must be earned in PHY 211 before taking PHY 212.

PHY 331 – Electricity & Magnetism
This course is a thorough introduction to one of the two fundamental disciplines of classical physics, using vector calculus methods. After a brief review of vector analysis, the first semester will treat electrostatic and magnetic fields and provide an introduction to the special theory of relativity. The second semester will develop electrodynamics, including Maxwell’s equations, the propagation of electromagnetic waves, radiation and the electromagnetic theory of light. The treatment will be on the level of the text of Reitz, Milford and Christy. It is recommended that MAT 241 be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: MAT 233 and PHY 202 with a grade of “C-” or higher in each course; PHY 331 must precede PHY 332.

PHY 421 – Intro to Modern Physics
For physics, engineering and chemistry majors, this is a one-year sequence that discusses the most important developments in 20th century physics. The first semester will review special relativity and treat the foundations of quantum physics from a historical perspective; the quantum theory of one-electron atoms will be developed. In the second semester, there will be a treatment of many-electron atoms, molecules and solids, with an introduction to nuclear and elementary particle physics. The text will be on the level of Eisberg and Resnick, Quantum Physics Prerequisites: MAT 132 and PHY 202; PHY 421 must precede PHY 422. Co-requisites: PHY 421L, PHY 422L.

PHY 421 L – Intro to Modern Phy. Lab
Laboratory work will include experimental determination of fundamental constants such as h, e and e/m as well as standard experiments such as Franck-Hertz, Rutherford scattering, electronic spin resonance, Millikan oil-drop, Bragg diffraction, etc. Co-requisites: PHY 421, PHY 422.

POL 111 – International Relations
This course is an introduction to the conduct of politics in a condition of anarchy. The central issues will be how and whether independent states can establish and preserve international order and cooperate for the achievement of their common interests in an anarchic environment. These questions will be explored through a reading of relevant history and theoretical writings and an examination of present and future trends influencing world politics.

POL 121 – Intro to Comparative Politics
This course traces the evolution of major theories and methodologies of comparative politics from the 1960s to present, analyzing both their distinguishing characteristics and how these theories respond to the prominent political issues and intellectual debates of their times. Topics to be covered include: political behavior, political culture, revolutions, modernization, political economy, rational choice, institutions and the state with democratization serving as an overarching theme. Offered spring semester.

POL 202 – State & Local Government
Course description not available

POL 231 – Asian Politics
This course is a general introduction to the variety of political systems in Asia, concentrating particularly on the nations of East Asia. It will emphasize the methods of comparative political study and will focus on understanding the factors that determine different political outcomes in nations that share a geographical region and many similar cultural and historical influences.

POL 290 ST – Public Policy
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

POL 302 – Amer. Political Parties
An in-depth study of the development of party organizations in the United States and an analysis of their bases of power. Offered fall semester of alternate years. Prerequisite: POL 101.

POL 331 – U.S. Foreign Policy
While Japan and China have both become prominent nation-states with increasing international influence, each country has achieved this feat through very different means. This course seeks to ascertain the sources and strength of their respective development paths as well as the prognosis for their political and economic futures. Topics to be covered include: state formation, ideology and political order, political and economic institutions, economic development strategies, ‘Asian values,’ state-society relations, regional and international relations. Prerequisite: POL 121 and POL 231, or permission of the instructor.

POL 341 – Political Phil I: Ancient & Medieval
This is an examination of the origins of philosophical reflection on the fundamental issues of politics, which is designed to lead to the critical consideration of the political views of our time. Among the topics discussed are the relationship between knowledge and political power and the character of political justice. Portions of the works of Aristophanes, Plato, Cicero and Alfarabi are examined. Offered fall semester in alternate years. Prerequisite: COR 201 or permission of the instructor.

POL 361 – European Politics
This course is a factual, conceptual and historical introduction to politics on the European continent, including (but not necessarily limited to) Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Russia and the European Union. These regimes will be studied through a comparison of their social structures, party systems, institutions and constitutions, political cultures and (if possible) their domestic policies. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POL 101.

POL 422 – Seminar in Chinese Politics
This course explores the ongoing political, social and economic transformations in Communist China, with emphasis on the post-Mao era (1978 to the present). General themes include Maoist versus Dengist politics, revolution versus reform, market reform in a communist state, factionalism, central-local relations, state-society relations and China in the international order. The course also examines current political and social issues. Prerequisite: POL 121 and POL 231, or permission of the instructor.

PSY 101 – Intro to Psych
This course provides a general introduction to psychology, with an emphasis on helping students appreciate how psychologist attempt to answer questions using the scientific method. Topics within neuropsychology, learning, memory, development, clinical and social psychology are considered from an empirical point of view. Offered every semester (TU); Offered twice annually (EDP).

PSY 203 – Learning & Conditioning
This course examines the empirical and theoretical issues surrounding learned behavior. Most of the data discussed come from studies in operant conditioning. Emphasis will be placed on how learning principles explain everyday human behavior and are used in the treatment of abnormal behavior patterns. Offered annually in the fall (TU); Offered annually (EDP). Prerequisite: PSY 101

PSY 204 – Social Psychology
Social psychology is the study of human beings in interaction with each other or under the pressure of forces of social influence. The course will include a consideration of conformity, persuasion, attraction, aggression, self-presentation and other relevant aspects of the social life. Offered annually in the fall. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of C- or higher.

PSY 205 – Theories of Personality
The goal of this course is to acquaint the student with the major theories of personality and with their applications. Students will be encouraged to engage in critical analysis and theoretical comparisons of the ideas presented from diverse, and often contradictory, perspectives. Offered annually in the fall (TU); Offered annually (EDP). Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 206 – Abnormal Psych
There are three main goals in this course. The first is to enhance the student’s understanding of psychopathology and major treatment approaches. The second is to help the student learn to evaluate critically the research evidence regarding therapeutic interventions. The third is to encourage self-examination of the student’s attitudes and those of our society regarding mental illness and the full range of human individual differences. Offered annually in the spring (TU); Offered annually (EDP). Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 209 – Behavioral Neuroscience
This course focuses on the neural and hormonal correlation of behavior including sleep, feeding, sexual behavior, learning and memory, language, movement and psychopathology including mood disorders and schizophrenia. Other topics include methods used in the brain sciences, the connection between stress and illness and how the brain recovers from injury. Offered annually in the fall. Prerequisites: PSY 101 with a grade of “C-” or higher and BIO 102. (Biology majors only need BIO 102.)

PSY 290 ST – Positive Psychology
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule.

PSY 290 ST – Addictions
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule.

PSY 301 – Research Methods
Through a combination of class discussion and hands-on research activity, this course provides students with exposure to a variety of research approaches. The course includes an examination of the nature of science, reliability and validity of measures, correlational techniques, and controlled experimental methods. Quasi-experimental designs and applications of research methods are also explored. Offered annually in the fall (TU); Offered annually (EDP). Prerequisites: PSY 101 and MAT 111.

PSY 307 – Cognitive Psychology
This course explores the nature and function of human thought processes. Topics to be considered include perception, attention, remembering and forgetting, mental imagery, psycholinguistics, problem solving and reasoning. Offered even years in the fall. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of “C-” or higher.

SEN 401 – Senior Transitions
In the liberal arts environment, students gain a broad education with essential communication and critical thinking skills. It is important that students also learn how to communicate those skills to potential employers or graduate schools. Senior Transitions picks up where Sophomore Choices leaves off, and teaches the skills necessary to implement the career decision. This seminar for seniors is designed to equip students with the knowledge, research skills, interview experiences, and personal insights necessary to assist in the life change from college student to career pursuit, further studies at the graduate level, or both. Students will be challenged to participate in exercises designed to explore career theories and utilize tools for career building while working to develop self-awareness and understanding of the world of work. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

SOC 101 – Intro to Sociology
This course offers an introduction to topics central to the study of human society, culture and conduct. Selected fields of study frequently include culture, formation of the self, social classes, power structures, social movements, criminal behavior and a variety of social institutions. Emphasis is placed upon basic concepts and principal findings of the field. Offered annually.

SOC 201 – The Family
This course focuses primarily on the changes in the American family since 1945. The topics discussed include trends in marriage, the age of marriage, fertility, illegitimacy, divorce, remarriage and domestic abuse. The possible social and economic causes and consequences of these trends are also discussed. Offered annually.

SOC 305 – Film & Society
No description available.

SOC 306 – Race, Ethnicity, & Immigration
This course treats contemporary ethnic relations and the history of immigration in the United States. It considers the role of markets, government policy and culture in the formation of ethnic identity and the well being of ethnic groups. Although the chief concern is with the United States, a comparative approach is taken. Offered biennially.

SOC 401 – Nations and Nationalism
No description available.

SPN 101 – Elementary Spanish
These courses are an introduction to understanding, speaking, reading and writing Spanish. Emphasis will be placed on acquiring a foundation in basic grammar as well as on listening comprehension and spoken Spanish through class activities, tapes and videos. Prerequisite: None for SPN 101; SPN 101 or placement by testing required for SPN 102.

SPN 201 – Intermediate Spanish
This course is intended to review basic grammar and develop more complex patterns of written and spoken Spanish. Short compositions, readings from Spanish and Spanish-American literature and class discussions require active use of students’ acquired knowledge of Spanish and form the basis for the expansion of vocabulary and oral expression. Prerequisite: SPN 102 or placement by testing.

SPN 302 – Intro to Hispanic Literature
This course offers an introduction to literary analysis based on a rigorous program of readings from Spanish and Spanish American literatures. It is a skills-building course that familiarizes students with the lexicon of literary criticism in Spanish and trains them to be active readers of Hispanic literature. Students read and analyze (orally and in writing) representative works of the four fundamental genres of literature: Narrative, Poetry, Drama and Essay. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 301 or placement by testing.

SPN 406 – French & Spanish Crossroads
This course uses Spanish- and French-speaking countries in proximity to each other in the Caribbean or Africa as a point of departure for literary, cultural, social and service learning exploration. Offerings may focus upon Haiti and the Dominican Republic, Martinique and Cuba, Equatorial Guinea in relation to Senegal or other appropriate pairings. The course is taught in English and students without advanced skills in French or Spanish may register. Cross-listed as FRE 406. Prerequisite: SPN 301 for Spanish major or minor credit; FRE 301 for French major or minor credit.

THE 100 – Production Laboratory
Designed for Theatre majors who participate in full semester productions at OU. This 1-credit lab is designed to offer a diversity of experience and provide students with comprehensive and hands-on training in the creation of a fully realized theatrical production. Theatre majors are required to take Production Lab for 4 semesters, concentrating on at least 2 different areas of production. All required meetings, rehearsals, production crew hours, and performances will be clearly specified for each student.

THE 105 – Beginning Characterization
This course explores the physical and mental foundations necessary for successful stage performance. Students will be expected to engage in hands-on exercises, physical and vocal warm-ups and performance work (both individual and partnered) throughout the semester. The basic principles of the Stanislavski method will be explored through stage combat, mime, movement, vocalization and contemporary characterization.

THE 290 ST – Directing Film/Dig. Cinema
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

THE 305 – Shakespearean Performance
This course affords the advanced acting student an opportunity to explore methods for rehearsing and performing texts written by William Shakespeare. With a focus on the practical demands of Shakespeare’s language, the course addresses technical, stylistic, historical and interpretive considerations as they relate to performance. Prerequisite: THE 205 or permission of the instructor.

THE 310 – Stagecraft
Stagecraft provides hands-on experience and assignments designed to physically and mentally engage the technician and designer. This class will focus on historical perspective as well as individual research and design. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a mid-term examination, written assignments, the completion of a minimum number of practicum hours and a final design project.

THE 490 – AST: 20th Century Acting Styles
This course will be a study of a selected topic in theatre. Recent topics have focused on adapting non-dramatic texts for the stage, devised and collaborative theatre, and advanced playwriting.. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

ULP 303 – The New Amer. City
The purpose of this course is to examine the problems and prospects of politics and policymaking in the new American city and its environs. Consideration will be given to the political and sociological significance of a number of the factors that characterize this new development the role and influence of the political, business, civil, and socio-cultural environment, exploration of extremes of wealth and poverty, the mix of racial and ethnic groups, and the opportunities and challenges provided by progress in transportation and technology. Offered annually.

WGS 290 ST – Media & Body Image
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

WGS 290 ST – Princes/Courtesans/Hermit
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

WGS 490 – Advanced: Gender in Modern Europe
This course is intended to introduce the student to the study of women and gender. Special emphasis is placed on the intersection of gender with the epistemological foundations of other disciplines and on the theory and practice of the study of gender. Courses are not limited to, for example, Southern Women’s Literature and History, but will often be under the same rubric of other disciplines such as are listed under the requirements of the minor.

WRI 101 Core Writing Workshop (4 hours)
This course is designed to assist students in the writing-intensive COR 101 course. Emphasis in the course will be on preparing drafts or series of short writing assignments that will allow an approach to required papers in incremental ways. The goal of the course will be to improve students’ understanding of Core texts, reading and note taking skills and written responses to these texts. The course does not meet any requirements for the writing minor.

WRI 200 Independent Study in Writing (1-4 hours)
This course will be conducted as supervised research on a selected topic. It is open to students pursuing a minor in writing or a major in communication and rhetoric studies. Prerequisites: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the registrar’s office no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 5.15.).

WRI 290 Special Topics in Writing (4 hours)
Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

WRI 400 Advanced Independent Study in Writing (1-4 hours)
This course will be supervised advanced research on selected topics. It is open to students pursing a minor in writing or a major in communication and rhetoric studies. Prerequisites: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the registrar’s
office no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 5.15.).

WRI 490 Advanced Special Topics in Writing (4 hours)
Study of a selected topic in the field of writing, such as Play and Screen Writing, Memoir, Scientific and Technical Writing, Oral History and The Art of the Essay. The topic will vary from year to year and may be offered by communication and rhetoric studies faculty or English faculty. Prerequisites for special topics taken with communication and rhetoric studies faculty: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

WRI 490 Advanced Special Topics in Writing: Writing Capstone and Portfolio (4 hours)
All (TU) Writing minors are required to complete this course and to submit a writing portfolio by the end of their senior year.